Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

What Happened This Day In History.A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 8

1587 Mary, Queen of Scots is.Union troops under Gen. Ambrose Burnside defeat a Confederate defense force at the Battle of Roanoke Island, N.C.

1865 Confederate raider William Quantrill and men attack a group of Federal wagons at New Market, Kentucky.

1887 Congress passes the Dawes Act, which gives citizenship to Indians living apart from their tribe.

1900 British General Buller is beaten at Ladysmith, South Africa as the British flee over the Tugela River.

1904 In a surprise attack at Port Arthur, Korea, the Japanese disable seven Russian warships.

1910 The Boy Scouts of America is incorporated.

1924 The gas chamber is used for the first time to execute a murderer.

1942 The Japanese land on Singapore.

1943 British General Orde Wingate leads a guerrilla force of “Chindits” against the Japanese in Burma.

1952 Elizabeth becomes Queen of England after her father, King George VI, dies.

1962 The U.S. Defense Department reports the creation of the Military Assistance Command in South Vietnam.

1965 South Vietnamese bomb the North Vietnamese communications center at Vinh Linh.

1971 South Vietnamese ground forces, backed by American air power, begin Operation Lam Son 719, a 17,000 man incursion into Laos that ends three weeks later in a disaster.

1990 CBS television temporarily suspends Andy Rooney for his anti-gay and ant-black remarks in a magazine interview.

Born on February 8

412 St. Proclus, Patriarch of Constantinople

1820 William T. Sherman, Union general in the American Civil War.

1828 Jules Verne, French novelist, one of the first writers of science fiction (Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea).

1834 Dmitri Ivanovich Medeleyev, Russian chemist, developed the periodic table of elements.

1851 Kate (O’Flaherty ) Chopin, novelist, short story writer (The Awakening).

1906 Chester F. Carlson, physicist, inventor of xerography, the electrostatic dry-copy process.

1906 Henry Roth, writer (Call it Sleep).

1911 Elizabeth Bishop, poet.

1926 Neal Cassaday, writer, counterculture proponent.

1931 James Dean, film actor and 1950s teenage icon (Rebel Without a Cause, East of Eden, Giant).

1940 Ted Koppel, television journalist.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, Jan. 13, the 13th day of 2015. There are 352 days left in the year.

On Jan. 13, 1915, a magnitude-7 earthquake centered in Avezzano, Italy, claimed some 30,000 lives.

In 1733, James Oglethorpe and some 120 English colonists arrived at Charleston, South Carolina, while en route to settle in present-day Georgia.

In 1794, President George Washington approved a measure adding two stars and two stripes to the American flag, following the admission of Vermont and Kentucky to the Union. (The number of stripes was later reduced to the original 13.)

In 1864, American songwriter Stephen Foster died in poverty in a New York hospital at age 37.

In 1883, the Henrik Ibsen play “An Enemy of the People” was first performed in Christiania (Oslo), Norway.

In 1898, Emile Zola’s famous defense of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, “J’accuse,” (zhah-KOOZ’) was published in Paris.

In 1941, a new law went into effect granting Puerto Ricans U.S. birthright citizenship. Novelist and poet James Joyce died in Zurich, Switzerland, less than a month before his 59th birthday.

In 1962, comedian Ernie Kovacs died in a car crash in west Los Angeles 10 days before his 43rd birthday.

In 1964, Roman Catholic Bishop Karol Wojtyla (voy-TEE’-wah) (the future Pope John Paul II) was appointed Archbishop of Krakow, Poland, by Pope Paul VI.

In 1978, former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey died in Waverly, Minnesota, at age 66.

In 1982, an Air Florida 737 crashed into Washington, D.C.’s 14th Street Bridge and fell into the Potomac River after taking off during a snowstorm, killing a total of 78 people; four passengers and a flight attendant survived.

In 1990, L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia became the nation’s first elected black governor as he took the oath of office in Richmond.

In 2000, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates stepped aside as chief executive and promoted company president Steve Ballmer to the position.

Ten years ago: Major League Baseball adopted a tougher steroid-testing program that would suspend first-time offenders for 10 days and randomly test players year-round.

Five years ago: Haitians piled bodies along the devastated streets of their capital a day after a powerful earthquake, while in Washington, President Barack Obama pledged an all-out rescue and relief effort. During the first hearing of the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, top Wall Street bankers apologized for risky behavior that led to the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, but still declared it seemed appropriate at the time. Rhythm-and-blues singer Teddy Pendergrass died in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, at age 59.

One year ago: A shooting at a Wesley Chapel, Florida, movie theater left Chad Oulson, 43, dead; retired Tampa police captain Curtis Reeves, 71, is accused of killing Oulson during what authorities said was an argument over Oulson’s texting just before a showing of the movie “Lone Survivor.” Two Fullerton, California, police officers who were videotaped in a violent struggle with a homeless man, Kelly Thomas, during an arrest were acquitted by a jury in Santa Ana of killing him.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Frances Sternhagen is 85. TV personality Nick Clooney is 81. Actor-comedian Charlie Brill is 77. Actor Billy Gray is 77. Actor Richard Moll is 72. Rock musician Trevor Rabin is 61. Rhythm-and-blues musician Fred White is 60. Rock musician James Lomenzo (Megadeth) is 56. Actor Kevin Anderson is 55. Actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus is 54. Rock singer Graham “Suggs” McPherson (Madness) is 54. Country singer Trace Adkins is 53. Actress Penelope Ann Miller is 51. Actor Patrick Dempsey is 49. Actress Traci Bingham is 47. Actor Keith Coogan is 45. TV producer-writer Shonda Rhimes is 45. Actress Nicole Eggert is 43. Actor Michael Pena is 39. Actor Orlando Bloom is 38. Meteorologist Ginger Zee (TV: “Good Morning America”) is 34. Actor Julian Morris is 32. Actor Liam Hemsworth (Film: “The Hunger Games”) is 25.

Thought for Today: “I am tomorrow, or some future day, what I establish today. I am today what I established yesterday or some previous day.” — James Joyce (1882-1941).

Today In History

Today is Monday, Jan. 12, the 12th day of 2015. There are 353 days left in the year.

On Jan. 12, 1915, the U.S. House of Representatives rejected, 204-174, a proposed constitutional amendment to give women nationwide the right to vote. The silent film drama “A Fool There Was,” which propelled Theda Bara to stardom with her portrayal of a predatory vamp, premiered in New York.

In 1519, Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I died.

In 1773, the first public museum in America was organized in Charleston, South Carolina.

In 1828, the United States and Mexico signed a Treaty of Limits defining the boundary between the two countries to be the same as the one established by an 1819 treaty between the U.S. and Spain.

In 1912, textile workers at the Everett Mill in Lawrence, Massachusetts, most of them immigrant women, walked off the job to protest wage cuts.

In 1932, Hattie W. Caraway became the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate after initially being appointed to serve out the remainder of the term of her late husband, Thaddeus.

In 1945, during World War II, Soviet forces began a major, successful offensive against the Germans in Eastern Europe. Aircraft from U.S. Task Force 38 sank about 40 Japanese ships off Indochina.

In 1959, Berry Gordy Jr. founded Motown Records (originally Tamla Records) in Detroit.

In 1965, the music variety show “Hullabaloo” premiered on NBC-TV with host-of-the-week Jack Jones; guests included Joey Heatherton, the New Christy Minstrels and Woody Allen. Playwright Lorraine Hansberry (“A Raisin in the Sun”) died in New York at age 34.

In 1975, the Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the Minnesota Vikings 16-6 to win Super Bowl IX at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans.

In 1986, the shuttle Columbia blasted off with a crew that included the first Hispanic-American in space, Dr. Franklin R. Chang-Diaz.

In 1995, Qubilah Shabazz (keh-BEE’-lah shuh-BAZ’), the daughter of Malcolm X, was arrested in Minneapolis on charges she’d tried to hire a hitman to kill Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan (the charges were later dropped in a settlement with the government).

In 2000, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Illinois v. Wardlow, gave police broad authority to stop and question people who run at the sight of an officer.

Ten years ago: A NASA spacecraft, Deep Impact, blasted off on a mission to smash a hole in a comet and give scientists a glimpse of the frozen primordial ingredients of the solar system. (The probe crashed into Comet Tempel 1 in July 2005.) Democrat Christine Gregoire, winner of the extremely close Washington governor’s race, was inaugurated. Britain’s Prince Harry apologized after a newspaper published a photograph of the young royal wearing a Nazi uniform to a costume party.

Five years ago: Haiti was struck by a magnitude-7 earthquake; the Haitian government says 316,000 people were killed, while a report prepared for the U.S. Agency for International Development suggests the death toll may have been between 46,000 and 85,000. U.S. and Mexican authorities announced the capture of Teodoro Garcia Simental, a high-ranking member of the Tijuana cartel known as “El Teo.”

One year ago: Officials announced that Iran had agreed to limit uranium enrichment and to open its nuclear program to daily inspection by international experts. Southwest Flight 4013, a Boeing 737 from Chicago, landed at the wrong Missouri airfield while enroute to Branson. Jeremy Abbott won his fourth U.S. figure skating title at the championships in Boston. At the Golden Globes, “12 Years a Slave” won for best motion picture drama while “American Hustle” was named best musical or comedy picture.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Katherine MacGregor (TV: “Little House on the Prairie”) is 90. Singer Glenn Yarbrough is 85. The Amazing Kreskin is 80. Country singer William Lee Golden (The Oak Ridge Boys) is 76. Rock musician Cynthia Robinson (Sly and the Family Stone) is 71. Actor Anthony Andrews is 67. Movie director Wayne Wang is 66. Radio commentator Rush Limbaugh is 64. Actress Kirstie Alley is 64. Writer Walter Mosley is 63. Country singer Ricky Van Shelton is 63. Radio-TV personality Howard Stern is 61. Writer-producer-director John Lasseter is 58. Broadcast journalist Christiane Amanpour is 57. Rock musician Charlie Gillingham (Counting Crows) is 55. Actor Oliver Platt is 55. Basketball Hall of Famer Dominique Wilkins is 55. Entrepreneur Jeff Bezos is 51. Actor Olivier Martinez is 49. Rapper TBird (B-Rock and the Bizz) is 48. Model Vendela is 48. Actress Farrah Forke is 47. Actress Rachael Harris is 47. Rock singer Zack de la Rocha is 45. Rapper Raekwon (Wu Tang Clan) is 45. Singer Dan Haseltine (Jars of Clay) is 42. Rock musician Matt Wong (Reel Big Fish) is 42. Singer Melanie Chisholm (Spice Girls) is 41. Contemporary Christian singer Jeremy Camp is 37. Rhythm-and-blues singer Amerie is 35. Actress Naya Rivera is 28. Actor Will Rothhaar is 28. Actor Andrew Lawrence is 27. Rock singer Zayn Malik (One Direction) is 22.

Thought for Today: “Censorship ends in logical completeness when nobody is allowed to read any books except the books that nobody reads.” — George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright (1856-1950).

Today In History

Today is Sunday, Jan. 11, the 11th day of 2015. There are 354 days left in the year.

On Jan. 11, 1935, aviator Amelia Earhart began an 18-hour trip from Honolulu to Oakland, California, that made her the first person to fly solo across any part of the Pacific Ocean.

In 1815, Sir John A. Macdonald, the first prime minister of Canada, was born in Glasgow, Scotland.

In 1861, Alabama became the fourth state to withdraw from the Union.

In 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed the Grand Canyon National Monument (it became a national park in 1919).

In 1913, the first enclosed sedan-type automobile, a Hudson, went on display at the 13th National Automobile Show in New York.

In 1927, the creation of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was proposed during a dinner of Hollywood luminaries at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.

In 1939, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and Lord Halifax, the British foreign secretary, met with Italian leader Benito Mussolini in Rome.

In 1942, Japan declared war against the Netherlands, the same day that Imperial Japanese forces invaded the Dutch East Indies.

In 1964, U.S. Surgeon General Luther Terry issued “Smoking and Health,” a report which concluded that “cigarette smoking contributes substantially to mortality from certain specific diseases and to the overall death rate.”

In 1965, the Beach Boys recorded their version of “Do You Wanna Dance?” by Bobby Freeman at Gold Star Studios in Hollywood.

In 1977, France set off an international uproar by releasing Abu Daoud, a PLO official behind the massacre of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics.

In 1989, nine days before leaving the White House, President Ronald Reagan bade the nation farewell in a prime-time address, saying of his eight years in office: “We meant to change a nation and instead we changed a world.”

In 1995, 51 people were killed when a Colombian DC-9 jetliner crashed as it was preparing to land near the Caribbean resort of Cartagena — however, 9-year-old Erika Delgado survived.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush nominated federal judge Michael Chertoff to be Homeland Security chief, succeeding Tom Ridge. Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi (EE’-yahd ah-LAH’-wee) publicly acknowledged for the first time that parts of Iraq probably wouldn’t be safe enough for people to vote in upcoming elections. James Griffin, founding member of the 1970s pop group Bread, died in Franklin, Tennessee, at age 61.

Five years ago: A federal judge in San Francisco began hearing arguments in a lawsuit aimed at overturning Proposition 8, California’s voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage. (Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn R. Walker later overturned the ban; his ruling was upheld on appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.) Mark McGwire admitted to The Associated Press that he’d used steroids and human growth hormone when he broke baseball’s home run record in 1998. Miep Gies (meep khees), the Dutch office secretary who defied Nazi occupiers to hide Anne Frank and her family for two years and saved the teenager’s diary, died at age 100. French New Wave director Eric Rohmer, 89, died in Paris.

One year ago: Former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, 85, died eight years after a devastating stroke left him in a coma. Alex Rodriguez was dealt the most severe punishment in the history of baseball’s drug agreement when an arbitrator ruled the New York Yankees third baseman was suspended for the entire 2014 season as the result of a drug investigation. Gracie Gold won her first U.S. figure skating title at the championships in Boston; Charlie White and Meryl Davis won a record sixth straight U.S. ice dance title.

Today’s Birthdays: Producer Grant Tinker is 90. Actor Rod Taylor is 85. The former prime minister of Canada, Jean Chretien (zhahn kray-tee-EHN’), is 81. Actor Mitchell Ryan is 81. Actor Felix Silla is 78. Movie director Joel Zwick is 73. Country singer Naomi Judd is 69. World Golf Hall of Famer Ben Crenshaw is 63. Singer Robert Earl Keen is 59. Actress Phyllis Logan (TV: “Downton Abbey”) is 59. Musician Vicki Peterson (The Bangles) is 57. Actress Kim Coles is 53. Actor Jason Connery is 52. Contemporary Christian musician Jim Bryson (MercyMe) is 47. Rock musician Tom Dumont (No Doubt) is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Maxee Maxwell (Brownstone) is 46. Movie director Malcolm D. Lee is 45. Singer Mary J. Blige is 44. Musician Tom Rowlands (The Chemical Brothers) is 44. Actor Marc Blucas is 43. Actress Amanda Peet is 43. Actor Rockmond Dunbar is 42. Actress Aja Naomi King (TV: “How to Get Away With Murder”) is 30. Actress Kristolyn Lloyd (TV: “The Bold and the Beautiful”) is 30. Reality TV star Jason Wahler (TV: “Laguna Beach”; “The Hills”) is 28. Pop singer Cody Simpson is 18.

Thought for Today: “If you are ruled by mind you are a king; if by body, a slave.” — Cato, Roman statesman and historian (234 B.C.-149 B.C.)

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, Dec. 30, the 364th day of 2014. There is one day left in the year.

On Dec. 30, 1922, Vladimir I. Lenin proclaimed the establishment of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which lasted nearly seven decades before dissolving in Dec. 1991.

In 1813, British troops burned Buffalo, New York, during the War of 1812.

In 1853, the United States and Mexico signed a treaty under which the U.S. agreed to buy some 45,000 square miles of land from Mexico for $10 million in a deal known as the Gadsden Purchase.

In 1903, about 600 people died when fire broke out at the recently opened Iroquois Theater in Chicago.

In 1936, the United Auto Workers union staged its first “sit-down” strike at the General Motors Fisher Body Plant No. 1 in Flint, Michigan. (The strike lasted until Feb. 11, 1937.)

In 1944, King George II of Greece proclaimed a regency to rule his country, virtually renouncing the throne.

In 1954, Olympic gold medal runner Malvin G. Whitfield became the first black recipient of the James E. Sullivan Award for amateur athletes.

In 1965, Ferdinand Marcos was inaugurated for his first term as president of the Philippines.

In 1979, Broadway composer Richard Rodgers died in New York at age 77.

In 1989, a Northwest Airlines DC-10, which had been the target of a telephoned threat, flew safely from Paris to Detroit with 22 passengers amid extra-tight security.

In 1994, a gunman walked into a pair of suburban Boston abortion clinics and opened fire, killing two employees. (John C. Salvi III was later convicted of murder; he died in prison, an apparent suicide.)

In 1999, former Beatle George Harrison fought off a knife-wielding intruder who broke into his mansion west of London and stabbed him in the chest. (Michael Abram was later acquitted of attempted murder by reason of insanity.)

In 2006, Iraqis awoke to news that Saddam Hussein had been hanged; victims of his three decades of autocratic rule took to the streets to celebrate.

Ten years ago: Democrat Christine Gregoire was declared victor of Washington’s gubernatorial election over Republican Dino Rossi by 129 votes out of more than 2.8 million cast. A fire broke out during a rock concert at a nightclub in Buenos Aires, Argentina, killing 194 people. Bandleader and clarinetist Artie Shaw died in Thousand Oaks, California, at age 94.

Five years ago: Seven CIA employees and a Jordanian intelligence officer were killed by a suicide bomber at a U.S. base in Khost, Afghanistan. British contractor Peter Moore was freed more than two years after he was abducted outside Iraq’s Finance Ministry. Former Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid, 69, who had ruled after the fall of dictator Suharto, died in Jakarta.

One year ago: Six states were named by federal officials to develop test sites for drones: Alaska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Texas and Virginia. Barely 12 hours after the NFL’s regular season ended, four more head coaches were fired: Washington’s Mike Shanahan, Detroit’s Jim Schwartz, Minnesota’s Leslie Frazier and Tampa Bay’s Greg Schiano. (Cleveland’s Rob Chudzinski had been fired the night before.)

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Joseph Bologna is 80. Actor Russ Tamblyn is 80. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Sandy Koufax is 79. Actor Jack Riley is 79. Folk singer Noel Paul Stookey is 77. TV director James Burrows is 74. Actor Fred Ward is 72. Singer-musician Michael Nesmith is 72. Actress Concetta Tomei (toh-MAY’) is 69. Singer Patti Smith is 68. Rock singer-musician Jeff Lynne is 67. TV personality Meredith Vieira is 61. Actress Sheryl Lee Ralph is 59. Actress Patricia Kalember is 58. Country singer Suzy Bogguss is 58. “Today” show co-host Matt Lauer is 57. Actress-comedian Tracey Ullman is 55. Rock musician Rob Hotchkiss is 54. Radio-TV commentator Sean Hannity is 53. Sprinter Ben Johnson is 53. Actor George Newbern is 51. Singer Jay Kay (Jamiroquai) is 45. Rock musician Byron McMackin (Pennywise) is 45. Actress Meredith Monroe is 45. Actor Daniel Sunjata is 43. Actress Maureen Flannigan is 42. Actor Jason Behr is 41. Golfer Tiger Woods is 39. TV personality-boxer Laila Ali is 37. Actress Lucy Punch is 37. Singer-actor Tyrese Gibson is 36. Actress Eliza Dushku is 34. Rock musician Tim Lopez (Plain White T’s) is 34. Actress Kristin Kreuk is 32. Folk-rock singer-musician Wesley Schultz (The Lumineers) is 32. NBA player LeBron James is 30. Pop-rock singer Ellie Goulding (GOL’-ding) is 28. Pop-rock musician Jamie Follese (FAHL’-es-ay) (Hot Chelle (shel) Rae) is 23.

Thought for Today: “I respect faith, but doubt is what gives you an education.” — Wilson Mizner, American playwright (1876-1933).

Today In History

Today is Monday, Dec. 15, the 349th day of 2014. There are 16 days left in the year.

On Dec. 15, 1944, the U.S. Senate approved the promotions of Henry H. Arnold, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur and George C. Marshall to the five-star rank of General of the Army and the nominations of William D. Leahy, Ernest J. King and Chester W. Nimitz as Admirals of the Fleet. U.S. forces invaded Mindoro Island in the Philippines, encountering little resistance from the Japanese. A single-engine plane carrying bandleader Glenn Miller, a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces, disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris.

In 1791, the Bill of Rights went into effect following ratification by Virginia.

In 1814, the “Hartford Convention” began as New England Federalists opposed to the War of 1812 secretly gathered in the Connecticut capital. (America’s victory in the Battle of New Orleans and the war’s end effectively discredited the Convention.)

In 1864, the two-day Battle of Nashville began during the Civil War as Union forces commanded by Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas attacked Confederate troops led by Gen. John Bell Hood; the result was a resounding Northern victory.

In 1890, Sioux Indian Chief Sitting Bull and 11 other tribe members were killed in Grand River, South Dakota, during a confrontation with Indian police.

In 1938, groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial took place in Washington, D.C. with President Franklin D. Roosevelt taking part in the ceremony.

In 1939, the Civil War motion picture epic “Gone with the Wind,” starring Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable, had its world premiere in Atlanta.

In 1964, Canada’s House of Commons approved dropping the country’s “Red Ensign” flag in favor of a new design, the “Maple Leaf” flag.

In 1965, two U.S. manned spacecraft, Gemini 6A and Gemini 7, maneuvered to within 10 feet of each other while in orbit.

In 1974, the horror spoof “Young Frankenstein,” starring Gene Wilder and directed by Mel Brooks, was released by 20th Century Fox.

In 1989, a popular uprising began in Romania that resulted in the downfall of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu (chow-SHES’-koo).

In 1991, an Egyptian-registered ferry, the Salem Express, hit a reef and sank in the Red Sea; at least 470 people died, although some estimates are much higher.

In 2001, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy, was reopened to the public after a $27 million realignment that had dragged on for over a decade.

Ten years ago: Time Warner Inc. agreed to pay over $500 million to resolve federal securities fraud and accounting investigations of its America Online unit. American telecommunications giants Sprint Corp. and Nextel Communications Inc. announced they would merge in a $35 billion deal. Pauline Gore, mother of former Vice President Al Gore, died in Carthage, Tennessee; she was 92. The boxing drama “Million Dollar Baby,” starring Clint Eastwood (who also directed) and Hilary Swank, was put in limited release by Warner Bros.

Five years ago: World leaders formally opened a U.N. climate change conference in Copenhagen. The Washington, D.C. City Council voted to legalize same-sex marriage. Boeing’s new 787 “Dreamliner” jet went on its long-delayed first test flight, lifting off from Paine Field in Everett, Washington. Evangelist Oral Roberts died in Newport Beach, California, at age 91.

One year ago: Nelson Mandela was laid to rest in his childhood hometown, ending a 10-day mourning period for South Africa’s first black president. Michelle Bachelet easily won Chile’s presidential runoff. Academy Award-winning actress Joan Fontaine, 96, died in Carmel, California. Harold Camping, 92, a California preacher who’d used his radio ministry and thousands of billboards to broadcast the end of the world and then gave up when his date-specific doomsdays did not come to pass, died in Oakland, California.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor-comedian Tim Conway is 81. Singer Cindy Birdsong (The Supremes) is 75. Rock musician Dave Clark (The Dave Clark Five) is 72. Rock musician Carmine Appice (Vanilla Fudge) is 68. Actor Don Johnson is 65. Actress Melanie Chartoff is 64. Movie director Julie Taymor is 62. Movie director Alex Cox is 60. Actor Justin Ross is 60. Rock musician Paul Simonon (The Clash) is 59. Movie director John Lee Hancock (Film: “Saving Mr. Banks”; “The Blind Side”) is 58. DNC Vice Chairwoman Donna Brazile is 55. Country singer Doug Phelps (Brother Phelps; Kentucky Headhunters) is 54. Movie producer-director Reginald Hudlin is 53. Actress Helen Slater is 51. Actress Molly Price is 49. Actor Michael Shanks is 44. Actor Stuart Townsend is 42. Figure skater Surya Bonaly is 41. “Crowd-hyper” Kito Trawick (Ghostown DJs) is 37. Actor Adam Brody is 35. Actress Michelle Dockery (TV: “Downton Abbey”) is 33. Actor George O. Gore II is 32. Actress Camilla Luddington (TV: “Grey’s Anatomy”) is 31. Rock musician Alana Haim (HYM) is 23. Actress Stefania Owen is 17.

Thought for Today: “Silence is more musical than any song.” — Christina Rossetti, British poet (1830-1874).

Today In History

Today is Friday, Dec. 12, the 346th day of 2014. There are 19 days left in the year.

On Dec. 12, 1870, Joseph H. Rainey of South Carolina became the first black lawmaker sworn into the U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1787, Pennsylvania became the second state to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

In 1897, “The Katzenjammer Kids,” the pioneering comic strip created by Rudolph Dirks, made its debut in the New York Journal.

In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt nominated Oscar Straus to be Secretary of Commerce and Labor; Straus became the first Jewish Cabinet member.

In 1911, Britain’s King George V announced during a visit to India that the capital would be transferred from Calcutta to Delhi.

In 1917, Father Edward Flanagan founded Boys Town outside Omaha, Neb.

In 1925, the first motel — the Motel Inn — opened in San Luis Obispo, Calif.

In 1937, Japanese aircraft sank the U.S. gunboat Panay on China’s Yangtze River. (Japan apologized, and paid $2.2 million in reparations.)

In 1946, a United Nations committee voted to accept a six-block tract of Manhattan real estate offered as a gift by John D. Rockefeller Jr. to be the site of the U.N.’s headquarters.

In 1963, Kenya became independent of Britain.

In 1974, “The Godfather, Part II,” a Paramount Pictures release, premiered in New York.

In 1985, 248 American soldiers and eight crew members were killed when an Arrow Air charter crashed after takeoff from Gander, Newfoundland.

In 2000, George W. Bush became president-elect as a divided U.S. Supreme Court reversed a state court decision for recounts in Florida’s contested election.

Ten years ago: A bomb exploded in a market in southern Philippines, killing at least 14 people. Militants blew up an Israeli base at the Gaza-Egypt crossing, killing five soldiers. Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas apologized to Kuwaitis for Palestinian support for Saddam Hussein after Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990.

Five years ago: Houston elected its first openly gay mayor, with voters handing a solid victory to City Controller Annise Parker after a hotly contested runoff with former city attorney Gene Locke. Rescue crews found the body of a climber on Oregon’s Mount Hood while two others remained missing. (The bodies of the other two climbers were found in Aug. 2010.) Sophomore tailback Mark Ingram became the first player at the University of Alabama to win the Heisman Trophy.

One year ago: The House voted to ease across-the-board federal spending cuts and head off future government shutdowns, acting after Speaker John Boehner unleashed a stinging attack on tea party-aligned conservative groups campaigning for the measure’s defeat. Actress Audrey Totter, 95, died in Los Angeles. Actor-writer-producer Tom O’Laughlin, 82, creator of “Billy Jack,” died in Thousand Oaks, California.

Today’s Birthdays: Former TV host Bob Barker is 91. Basketball Hall of Famer Bob Pettit is 82. Singer Connie Francis is 77. Singer Dionne Warwick is 74. Rock singer-musician Dickey Betts is 71. Former race car driver Emerson Fittipaldi is 68. Actor Wings Hauser is 67. Actor Bill Nighy (ny) is 65. Actor Duane Chase (Film: “The Sound of Music”) is 64. Country singer LaCosta is 64. Gymnast-turned-actress Cathy Rigby is 62. Author Lorna Landvik is 60. Singer-musician Sheila E. is 57. Actress Sheree J. Wilson is 56. Pop singer Daniel O’Donnell is 53. International Tennis Hall of Famer Tracy Austin is 52. Rock musician Eric Schenkman (Spin Doctors) is 51. Rock musician Nicholas Dimichino (Nine Days) is 47. Author Sophie Kinsella is 45. News anchor Maggie Rodriguez is 45. Actress Jennifer Connelly is 44. Actress Madchen Amick is 44. Actress Regina Hall is 44. Country singer Hank Williams III is 42. Actress Mayim Bialik is 39. Model Bridget Hall is 37.

Thought for Today: “To escape criticism — do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.” — Elbert Hubbard, American author and publisher (1856-1915).

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 10, the 344th day of 2014. There are 21 days left in the year.

On Dec. 10, 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. received his Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, saying he accepted it “with an abiding faith in America and an audacious faith in the future of mankind.”

In 1520, Martin Luther publicly burned the papal edict demanding that he recant, or face excommunication.

In 1787, Thomas H. Gallaudet, a pioneer of educating the deaf, was born in Philadelphia.

In 1817, Mississippi was admitted as the 20th state of the Union.

In 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt became the first American to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, for helping mediate an end to the Russo-Japanese War.

In 1931, Jane Addams became the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize; the co-recipient was Nicholas Murray Butler.

In 1948, the U.N. General Assembly adopted its Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

In 1950, Ralph J. Bunche was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the first black American to receive the award.

In 1962, “Lawrence of Arabia,” David Lean’s epic film starring Peter O’Toole as British military officer T.E. Lawrence, had its royal gala premiere in London.

In 1967, singer Otis Redding, 26, and six others were killed when their plane crashed into Wisconsin’s Lake Monona.

In 1972, baseball’s American League adopted the designated hitter rule on an experimental basis for three years.

In 1984, South African Bishop Desmond Tutu received the Nobel Peace Prize.

In 1994, Yasser Arafat, Shimon Peres and Yitzhak Rabin received the Nobel Peace Prize, pledging to pursue their mission of healing the anguished Middle East.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush picked Samuel Bodman to be the new energy secretary. Bernard Kerik withdrew his name from consideration to be President Bush’s homeland security secretary. Sprinter Michelle Collins was suspended for eight years for a doping violation linked to the BALCO scandal. (Collins was reinstated in May 2008.)

Five years ago: President Barack Obama accepted the Nobel Peace Prize with a humble acknowledgment of his scant accomplishments and a robust defense of the U.S. at war. James Cameron’s 3-D film epic “Avatar” had its world premiere in London.

One year ago: South Africa held a memorial service for Nelson Mandela, during which U.S. President Barack Obama energized tens of thousands of spectators and nearly 100 visiting heads of state with a plea for the world to emulate “the last great liberator of the 20th century.” (The ceremony was marred by the presence of a sign-language interpreter who deaf advocates said was an imposter waving his arms around meaninglessly.) General Motors named product chief Mary Barra its new CEO, making her the first woman to run a U.S. car company.

Today’s Birthdays: Soap opera creator Agnes Nixon is 87. Former Agriculture Secretary Clayton Yeutter (YEYE’-tur) is 84. Actor Tommy Kirk is 73. Actress Fionnula Flanagan is 73. Pop singer Chad Stuart (Chad and Jeremy) is 73. Actress-singer Gloria Loring is 68. Pop-funk musician Walter “Clyde” Orange (The Commodores) is 68. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ralph Tavares is 66. Rhythm-and-blues singer Jessica Cleaves (Friends of Distinction) is 66. Country singer Johnny Rodriguez is 63. Actress Susan Dey is 62. Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich is 58. Jazz musician Paul Hardcastle is 57. Actor-director Kenneth Branagh (BRAH’-nah) is 54. Actress Nia Peeples is 53. TV chef Bobby Flay is 50. Rock singer-musician J Mascis is 49. Rock musician Scot (cq) Alexander (Dishwalla) is 43. Actress-comedian Arden Myrin is 41. Rock musician Meg White (The White Stripes) is 40. Rapper Kuniva (D12) is 39. Actor Gavin Houston is 37. Violinist Sarah Chang is 34. Rock musician Noah Harmon (Airborne Toxic Event) is 33. Actor Patrick John Flueger is 31. Actress Raven-Symone is 29.

Thought for Today: “Beauty is not caused. It is.” — Emily Dickinson, American poet (born this date in 1830, died in 1886).

Today In History

Today is Monday, Dec. 8, the 342nd day of 2014. There are 23 days left in the year.

On Dec. 8, 1941, the United States entered World War II as Congress declared war against Imperial Japan, a day after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

In 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Gen. George Washington’s retreating army crossed the Delaware River from New Jersey into Pennsylvania.

In 1813, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92, was first performed in Vienna, with Beethoven himself conducting.

In 1854, Pope Pius IX proclaimed the Catholic dogma of the Immaculate Conception, which holds that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was free of original sin from the moment of her own conception.

In 1886, the American Federation of Labor was founded in Columbus, Ohio.

In 1914, “Watch Your Step,” the first musical revue to feature a score composed entirely by Irving Berlin, opened in New York.

In 1949, the Chinese Nationalist government moved from the Chinese mainland to Formosa as the Communists pressed their attacks.

In 1960, NBC broadcast a new, color videotape version of the TV special “Peter Pan” starring Mary Martin. (Two previous telecasts, also starring Martin, had been performed live in 1955 and 1956.)

In 1972, a United Airlines Boeing 737 crashed while attempting to land at Chicago-Midway Airport, killing 43 of the 61 people on board, as well as two people on the ground; among the dead were Dorothy Hunt, wife of Watergate conspirator E. Howard Hunt, U.S. Rep. George W. Collins, D-Ill., and CBS News correspondent Michele Clark.

In 1980, rock star John Lennon was shot to death outside his New York City apartment building by an apparently deranged fan.

In 1982, a man demanding an end to nuclear weapons held the Washington Monument hostage, threatening to blow it up with explosives he claimed were inside a van. (After a 10-hour standoff, Norman D. Mayer was shot dead by police; it turned out there were no explosives.)

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed a treaty at the White House calling for destruction of intermediate-range nuclear missiles.

In 1992, Americans got to see live television coverage of U.S. troops landing on the beaches of Somalia as Operation Restore Hope began (because of the time difference, it was early Dec. 9 in Somalia).

Ten years ago: The Senate completed congressional approval of the biggest overhaul of U.S. intelligence in a half-century, voting 89-2 to send the measure to President George W. Bush, who signed it nine days later. Disgruntled U.S. soldiers complained to Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld during a question-and-answer session in Kuwait about long deployments and a lack of armored vehicles and other equipment. Treasury Secretary John Snow accepted President Bush’s offer to remain in the Cabinet. “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott, 38, an influential heavy metal guitarist, was fatally shot with three other people during a performance in Columbus, Ohio; the gunman was then shot dead by a police officer.

Five years ago: Ohio executed murderer Kenneth Biros by performing the nation’s first lethal injection using a single drug, a supposedly less painful method than previous executions that required three drugs. A wave of coordinated bomb attacks targeting high-profile symbols of Iraqi authority killed at least 127 people.

One year ago: Hundreds of thousands of protesters poured into the streets of the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, toppling the statue of former Soviet leader Vladimir Lenin and blocking key government buildings in an escalating stand-off with the president on the future of the country. Zach Johnson rallied from four shots behind with eight holes to play and beat Tiger Woods, the No. 1 player in golf, at the World Challenge. Lydia Ko, a 16-year-old from New Zealand, rallied to win her first title as a professional, winning the Swinging Skirts World Ladies Masters with a three-stroke victory over South Korea’s So Yeon Ryu.

Today’s Birthdays: Flutist James Galway is 75. Singer Jerry Butler is 75. Pop musician Bobby Elliott (The Hollies) is 73. Actress Mary Woronov is 71. Actor John Rubinstein is 68. Rock singer-musician Gregg Allman is 67. Reggae singer Toots Hibbert (Toots and the Maytals) is 66. Actress Kim Basinger (BAY’-sing-ur) is 61. Rock musician Warren Cuccurullo is 58. Rock musician Phil Collen (Def Leppard) is 57. Country singer Marty Raybon is 55. World Bank President Jim Yong Kim is 55. Political commentator Ann Coulter is 53. Rock musician Marty Friedman is 52. Actor Wendell Pierce is 51. Actress Teri Hatcher is 50. Actor David Harewood is 49. Rapper Bushwick Bill (The Geto Boys) is 48. Singer Sinead (shih-NAYD’) O’Connor is 48. Actor Matthew Laborteaux is 48. Rock musician Ryan Newell (Sister Hazel) is 42. Actor Dominic Monaghan is 38. Actor Ian Somerhalder is 36. Rock singer Ingrid Michaelson is 35. R&B singer Chrisette Michele is 32. Actress Hannah Ware is 32. Country singer Sam Hunt is 30. Rock singer-actress Kate Voegele (VOH’-gehl) is 28. Christian rock musician Jen Ledger (Skillet) is 25. Actress AnnaSophia Robb is 21.

Thought for Today: “The unknown is what it is. And to be frightened of it is what sends everybody scurrying around chasing dreams, illusions, wars, peace, love, hate, all that. Unknown is what it is. Accept that it’s unknown and it’s plain sailing.” — John Lennon (1940-1980).

Today In History

Today is Saturday, Dec. 6, the 340th day of 2014. There are 25 days left in the year.

On Dec. 6, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln nominated Salmon P. Chase to be chief justice of the United States, succeeding Roger Taney (TAH’-nee). (Chase was installed as chief justice nine days later.)

In 1790, Congress moved to Philadelphia from New York.

In 1884, Army engineers completed construction of the Washington Monument by setting an aluminum capstone atop the obelisk.

In 1889, Jefferson Davis, the first and only president of the Confederate States of America, died in New Orleans.

In 1907, the worst mining disaster in U.S. history occurred as 362 men and boys died in a coal mine explosion in Monongah, West Virginia.

In 1917, some 2,000 people died when an explosives-laden French cargo ship collided with a Norwegian vessel at the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, setting off a blast that devastated the city.

In 1922, the Anglo-Irish Treaty, which established the Irish Free State, came into force one year to the day after it was signed in London.

In 1939, the Cole Porter musical comedy “Du Barry Was a Lady” opened on Broadway.

In 1947, Everglades National Park in Florida was dedicated by President Harry S. Truman.

In 1957, America’s first attempt at putting a satellite into orbit failed as Vanguard TV3 rose about four feet off a Cape Canaveral launch pad before crashing down and exploding.

In 1964, the animated puppet special “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” now a Christmas perennial, first aired on NBC-TV.

In 1971, the original Auto-Train, which carried rail passengers and their motor vehicles from Lorton, Virginia, to Sanford, Florida, went into operation. (Although the privately owned line went out of business in 1981, Amtrak revived the service in 1983.)

In 1989, 14 women were shot to death at the University of Montreal’s school of engineering by a man who then took his own life.

Ten years ago: Militants struck the U.S. Consulate in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia with explosives and machine guns, killing nine people in an attack claimed by al-Qaida. Ohio certified President George W. Bush’s 119,000-vote victory over Democratic nominee John Kerry, even as the Kerry campaign and third-party candidates prepared to demand a statewide recount. A dozen expensive homes under construction in Indian Head, Maryland, were deliberately burned down. (Five men either pleaded guilty or were convicted in the case; prosecutors had cited a variety of motives, including anger by some of the white perpetrators that most of the new homeowners were black.)

Five years ago: President Barack Obama visited the U.S. Senate during a rare Sunday session to rally Democrats behind closed doors on a health care overhaul. The Kennedy Center Honors lauded jazz great Dave Brubeck, rocker Bruce Springsteen, actor Robert De Niro, comic genius Mel Brooks and opera singer Grace Bumbry.

One year ago: A day after Nelson Mandela’s death at 95, South Africans of all colors erupted in song, dance and tears in emotional celebrations of the life of the man who had bridged the country’s black-white divide and helped avert a race war. The Fender Stratocaster that Bob Dylan played at the 1965 Newport Folk Festival was sold at Christie’s for nearly $1 million — the highest price ever paid for a guitar at auction.

Today’s Birthdays: Comedy performer David Ossman is 78. Actor Patrick Bauchau is 76. Country singer Helen Cornelius is 73. Actor James Naughton is 69. Former Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood is 69. Rhythm-and-blues singer Frankie Beverly (Maze) is 68. Former Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., is 66. Actress JoBeth Williams is 66. Actor Tom Hulce is 61. Actor Kin Shriner is 61. Actor Wil Shriner is 61. Actor Miles Chapin is 60. Rock musician Rick Buckler (The Jam) is 59. Comedian Steven Wright is 59. Country singer Bill Lloyd is 59. Singer Tish Hinojosa is 59. Rock musician Peter Buck (R.E.M.) is 58. Rock musician David Lovering (Pixies) is 53. Actress Janine Turner is 52. Rock musician Ben Watt (Everything But The Girl) is 52. Writer-director Judd Apatow is 47. Rock musician Ulf “Buddha” Ekberg (Ace of Base) is 44. Writer-director Craig Brewer is 43. Actress Colleen Haskell is 38. Actress Lindsay Price is 38. Actress Ashley Madekwe is 33. Actress Nora Kirkpatrick is 30. Christian rock musician Jacob Chesnut (Rush of Fools) is 25.

Thought for Today: “Disconnecting from change does not recapture the past. It loses the future.” — Kathleen Norris, American author (1880-1960).

Today In History

Today is Monday, Nov. 24, the 328th day of 2014. There are 37 days left in the year.

On Nov. 24, 1944, during World War II, U.S. bombers based on Saipan attacked Tokyo in the first raid against the Japanese capital by land-based planes.

In 1784, Zachary Taylor, the 12th president of the United States, was born in Orange County, Virginia.

In 1859, British naturalist Charles Darwin published “On the Origin of Species,” which explained his theory of evolution by means of natural selection.

In 1864, French artist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was born in Albi.

In 1922, Irish nationalist and author Robert Erskine Childers was executed in Dublin by Free State forces.

In 1939, British Overseas Airways Corp. (BOAC) was formally established.

In 1950, the musical “Guys and Dolls,” based on the writings of Damon Runyon and featuring songs by Frank Loesser (LEH’-suhr), opened on Broadway.

In 1963, Jack Ruby shot and mortally wounded Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy, in a scene captured on live television.

In 1969, Apollo 12 splashed down safely in the Pacific.

In 1971, a hijacker calling himself “Dan Cooper” (but who became popularly known as “D.B. Cooper”) parachuted from a Northwest Orient Airlines 727 over the Pacific Northwest after receiving $200,000 dollars in ransom — his fate remains unknown.

In 1974, the bone fragments of a 3.2 million-year-old hominid were discovered by scientists in Ethiopia; the skeletal remains were nicknamed “Lucy.”

In 1989, Romanian leader Nicolae Ceausescu (chow-SHES’-koo) was unanimously re-elected Communist Party chief. (Within a month, he was overthrown in a popular uprising and executed along with his wife, Elena, on Christmas Day.)

In 1992, a China Southern Airlines Boeing 737 crashed in southern China, killing all 141 people on board.

Ten years ago: Ukraine’s election officials declared that Kremlin-backed Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych (yah-noo-KOH’-vich) had won Ukraine’s bitterly disputed presidential runoff balloting; thousands of opposition supporters demonstrated in Kiev. Popular author Arthur Hailey died in New Providence, Bahamas, at age 84.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama played host at the first state dinner of his presidency to visiting Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, an event marred by two gatecrashers, Tareq and Michaele Salahi (mih-KEL’ sah-LAH’-hee). Kentucky officials said census worker Bill Sparkman, found bound and hanging from a tree with the word “fed” scrawled across his chest, had in fact committed suicide. Albert Pujols won the National League MVP unanimously, becoming the first player to repeat since Barry Bonds won four in a row from 2001-04.

One year ago: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu harshly condemned the international community’s nuclear deal with Iran, calling it a “historic mistake” and saying he was not bound by the agreement. The Vatican publicly unveiled a handful of bone fragments purportedly belonging to St. Peter, the first pope. Taylor Swift took home four American Music Awards, including top honor artist of the year for the third time.

Today’s Birthdays: Basketball Hall of Famer Oscar Robertson is 76. Country singer Johnny Carver is 74. Former NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue (TAG’-lee-uh-boo) is 74. Rock drummer Pete Best is 73. Actor-comedian Billy Connolly is 72. Former White House news secretary Marlin Fitzwater is 72. Former Motion Picture Association of America Chairman Dan Glickman is 70. Singer Lee Michaels is 69. Actor Dwight Schultz is 67. Actor Stanley Livingston is 64. Rock musician Clem Burke (Blondie; The Romantics) is 60. Record producer Terry Lewis is 58. Actor/director Ruben Santiago-Hudson is 58. Actress Denise Crosby is 57. Actress Shae D’Lyn is 52. Rock musician John Squire (The Stone Roses) is 52. Rock musician Gary Stonadge (Big Audio) is 52. Actor Conleth Hill is 50. Actor-comedian Brad Sherwood is 50. Actor Garret Dillahunt is 50. Actor-comedian Scott Krinsky is 46. Rock musician Chad Taylor (Live) is 44. Actress Lola Glaudini is 43. Actress Danielle Nicolet is 41. Actor/writer/director/producer Stephen Merchant is 40. Olympic bronze medal figure skater Chen Lu is 38. Actor Colin Hanks is 37. Actress Katherine Heigl (HY’-guhl) is 36. Actress Sarah Hyland is 24.

Thought for Today: “I don’t comment. I record.” — Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa NewsRoom [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Saturday, Nov. 22, the 326th day of 2014. There are 39 days left in the year.

On Nov. 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a motorcade in Dallas; Texas Gov. John B. Connally, in the same open car as the president, was seriously wounded. Suspected gunman Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested.

In 1718, English pirate Edward Teach — better known as “Blackbeard” — was killed during a battle off present-day North Carolina.

In 1862, Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “La Forza del Destino” had its world premiere in St. Petersburg, Russia.

In 1914, the First Battle of Ypres during World War I ended with an Allied victory against Germany.

In 1928, “Bolero” by Maurice Ravel (rah-VEL’) had its premiere at the Paris Opera.

In 1935, a flying boat, the China Clipper, took off from Alameda, California, carrying more than 100,000 pieces of mail on the first trans-Pacific airmail flight.

In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek (chang ky-shehk) met in Cairo to discuss measures for defeating Japan. Lyricist Lorenz Hart died in New York at age 48.

In 1954, the Humane Society of the United States was incorporated as the National Humane Society.

In 1965, the musical “Man of La Mancha” opened on Broadway.

In 1967, the U.N. Security Council approved Resolution 242, which called for Israel to withdraw from territories it had captured the previous June, and implicitly called on adversaries to recognize Israel’s right to exist.

In 1975, Juan Carlos was proclaimed King of Spain.

In 1989, Rene Mouawad was killed by a bomb after only 17 days as president of Lebanon.

In 1990, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, having failed to win re-election of the Conservative Party leadership on the first ballot, announced her resignation.

Ten years ago: Tens of thousands of demonstrators jammed downtown Kiev, denouncing Ukraine’s presidential runoff election as fraudulent and chanting the name of their reformist candidate, Viktor Yushchenko, who ended up winning a revote the following month. Iran said it had frozen all uranium enrichment programs; President George W. Bush said he hoped the statement was true but added, “there must be verification.”

Five years ago: Iran said it had begun large-scale air defense war games aimed at protecting its nuclear facilities from attack. Michael Jackson posthumously won four American Music Awards; Taylor Swift was named artist of the year; Adam Lambert’s sexually provocative performance drew complaints.

One year ago: On the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the city of Dallas paused to honor the fallen leader.

Today’s Birthdays: Movie director Arthur Hiller is 91. Actor Robert Vaughn is 82. Actor Michael Callan is 79. Actor Allen Garfield is 75. Animator and movie director Terry Gilliam is 74. Actor Tom Conti is 73. Singer Jesse Colin Young is 73. Astronaut Guion Bluford is 72. International Tennis Hall of Famer Billie Jean King is 71. Rock musician-actor Steve Van Zandt (a.k.a. Little Steven) is 64. Rock musician Tina Weymouth (The Heads; Talking Heads; The Tom Tom Club) is 64. Retired MLB All-Star Greg Luzinski is 64. Rock musician Lawrence Gowan is 58. Actor Richard Kind is 58. Actress Jamie Lee Curtis is 56. Alt-country singer Jason Ringenberg (Jason & the Scorchers) is 56. Actress Mariel Hemingway is 53. Actor Winsor Harmon is 51. Actor-turned-producer Brian Robbins is 51. Actor Stephen Geoffreys is 50. Rock musician Charlie Colin is 48. Actor Nicholas Rowe is 48. Actor Michael K. Williams is 48. Actor Mark Ruffalo is 47. International Tennis Hall of Famer Boris Becker is 47. Country musician Chris Fryar (Zac Brown Band) is 44. Actor Josh Cooke is 35. Actor-singer Tyler Hilton is 31. Actress Scarlett Johansson is 30. Actor Jamie Campbell Bower is 26. Singer Candice Glover is 25. Actor Alden Ehrenreich is 25.

Thought for Today: “Greatness is not measured by what a man or woman accomplishes, but by the opposition he or she has overcome to reach his goals.” — Dorothy Height, American civil rights activist (1912-2010).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Friday, Nov. 21, the 325th day of 2014. There are 40 days left in the year.

On Nov. 21, 1864, a letter was signed by President Abraham Lincoln expressing condolences to Lydia Bixby, a widow in Boston whose five sons supposedly died while fighting in the Civil War. (As it turned out, only two of Mrs. Bixby’s sons had been killed in battle; also, historians are not certain that Lincoln actually wrote the letter.)

In 1789, North Carolina became the 12th state to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

In 1861, Judah Benjamin, who had been acting Confederate Secretary of War, was formally named to the post.

In 1922, Rebecca L. Felton of Georgia was sworn in as the first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate.

In 1934, the Cole Porter musical “Anything Goes,” starring Ethel Merman as Reno Sweeney, opened on Broadway.

In 1942, the Alaska Highway, also known as the Alcan Highway, was formally opened at Soldier’s Summit in the Yukon Territory.

In 1964, the upper level of New York’s Verrazano Narrows Bridge, connecting Brooklyn and Staten Island, was opened.

In 1969, the Senate voted down the Supreme Court nomination of Clement F. Haynsworth, 55-45, the first such rejection since 1930.

In 1973, President Richard Nixon’s attorney, J. Fred Buzhardt (buh-ZAHRDT’), revealed the existence of an 18-1/2-minute gap in one of the White House tape recordings related to Watergate.

In 1974, bombs exploded at a pair of pubs in Birmingham, England, killing 21 people. (Six suspects were convicted of the attack, but the convictions of the so-called “Birmingham Six” were overturned in 1991.)

In 1980, 87 people died in a fire at the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.

In 1989, the proceedings of Britain’s House of Commons were televised live for the first time.

In 1991, the U.N. Security Council chose Boutros Boutros-Ghali of Egypt to be Secretary-General.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, trying to mend relations with Latin America, pledged during an economic summit in Chile to make a fresh push for stalled immigration reforms. Iraqi authorities set January 30, 2005, as the date for the nation’s first election since the collapse of Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship. Six Wisconsin hunters were shot to death by Chai Soua Vang, an ethnic Hmong immigrant who was later sentenced to life in prison.

Five years ago: The Senate voted 60-39 to open debate on health care legislation. An explosion at the Xinxing coal mine near Hegang city in China killed 108 miners. The University of East Anglia, in eastern England, reported that hackers had broken into a server at its Climatic Research Unit. (The hackers posted hundreds of private e-mails and documents online, stoking debate on whether some scientists had overstated the case for man-made climate change.) The shimmering, white glove Michael Jackson wore when he premiered his trademark moonwalk dance was auctioned off for $350,000 (plus $70,000 in taxes and fees) at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York’s Times Square.

One year ago: Sweeping aside a century of precedent, Democrats took a chunk out of the Senate’s hallowed filibuster tradition, clearing the way for speedy confirmation of controversial appointments made by President Barack Obama; Republicans warned Democrats would regret their actions once political fortunes were reversed and they could no longer block appointments made by a GOP president. Fifty-four people were killed in a supermaket roof collapse in Riga, Latvia. Three women were freed after being held captive 30 years in a south London home.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Joseph Campanella is 90. Country singer Jean Shepard is 81. Actor Laurence Luckinbill is 80. Actress Marlo Thomas is 77. Actor Rick Lenz is 75. Singer Dr. John is 74. Actress Juliet Mills is 73. Basketball Hall of Famer Earl Monroe is 70. Television producer Marcy Carsey is 70. Actress Goldie Hawn is 69. Movie director Andrew Davis is 68. Rock musician Lonnie Jordan (War) is 66. Singer Livingston Taylor is 64. Actress-singer Lorna Luft is 62. Actress Cherry Jones is 58. Rock musician Brian Ritchie (The Violent Femmes) is 54. Gospel singer Steven Curtis Chapman is 52. Actress Nicollette Sheridan is 51. Singer-actress Bjork (byork) is 49. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Troy Aikman is 48. Rhythm-and-blues singer Chauncey Hannibal (BLACKstreet) is 46. Rock musician Alex James (Blur) is 46. MLB All-Star player Ken Griffey Jr. is 45. TV personality Rib Hillis is 44. Rapper Pretty Lou (Lost Boyz) is 43. Football player-turned-talk show host Michael Strahan (STRAY’-han) is 43. Country singer Kelsi Osborn (SHeDAISY) is 40. Singer-actress Lindsey Haun is 30. Actress Jena Malone is 30. Pop singer Carly Rae Jepsen is 29. Actor-singer Sam Palladio is 27.

Thought for Today: “Never confuse motion with action.” — Ernest Hemingway, American author (1899-1961).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Thursday, Nov. 20, the 324th day of 2014. There are 41 days left in the year.

On Nov. 20, 1789, New Jersey became the first state to ratify the Bill of Rights.

In 1620, Peregrine White was born aboard the Mayflower in Massachusetts Bay; he was the first child born of English parents in present-day New England.

In 1910, the Mexican Revolution of 1910 had its beginnings under the Plan of San Luis Potosi issued by Francisco I. Madero.

In 1929, the radio program “The Rise of the Goldbergs” debuted on the NBC Blue Network.

In 1947, Britain’s future queen, Princess Elizabeth, married Philip Mountbatten, Duke of Edinburgh, at Westminster Abbey.

In 1959, the United Nations issued its Declaration of the Rights of the Child.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy held a news conference in which he announced the end of the naval quarantine of Cuba imposed during the missile crisis, and the signing of an executive order prohibiting discrimination in federal housing facilities.

In 1967, the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Clock at the Commerce Department ticked past 200 million.

In 1969, the Nixon administration announced a halt to residential use of the pesticide DDT as part of a total phaseout. A group of American Indian activists began a 19-month occupation of Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay.

In 1975, after nearly four decades of absolute rule, Spain’s General Francisco Franco died, two weeks before his 83rd birthday.

In 1984, pop star Michael Jackson was inducted into the Hollywood Walk of Fame with the unveiling of his star in front of a horde of screaming fans.

In 1992, fire seriously damaged Windsor Castle.

In 2003, Michael Jackson was booked on suspicion of child molestation in Santa Barbara, California. (Jackson was later acquitted at trial.) Record producer Phil Spector was charged with murder in the shooting death of actress Lana Clarkson at his home in Alhambra, California, in Feb. 2003. (Spector’s first trial ended with a hung jury in 2007; he was convicted of second-degree murder in 2009 and sentenced to 19 years to life in prison.)

Ten years ago: Republicans whisked a $388 billion spending bill through the House by a bipartisan 344-51 margin. Palestinians formally opened the campaign for a successor to Yasser Arafat. Scientist Ancel Keys, who invented the K rations eaten by soldiers in World War II and who linked high cholesterol and fatty diets to heart disease, died in Minneapolis at age 100.

Five years ago: Scientists in Geneva restarted the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest atom smasher, after a year of repairs. A Chinese national killed four people and wounded nine in a shooting rampage on the Pacific island of Saipan before taking his own life. Holding back tears, Oprah Winfrey told her studio audience that she would end her talk show in 2011 after a quarter-century on the air.

One year ago: Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. and Afghanistan had agreed on the language of a bilateral security pact that would clear the way for thousands of U.S troops to train and assist Afghan forces after the NATO combat mission ended in 2014. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation allowing same-sex weddings in his state.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress-comedian Kaye Ballard is 89. Actress Estelle Parsons is 87. Comedian Dick Smothers is 76. Singer Norman Greenbaum is 72. Vice President Joe Biden is 72. Actress Veronica Hamel is 71. Broadcast journalist Judy Woodruff is 68. Actor Samuel E. Wright is 68. Singer Joe Walsh is 67. Actor Richard Masur is 66. Opera singer Barbara Hendricks is 66. Actress Bo Derek is 58. Former NFL player Mark Gastineau is 58. Reggae musician Jim Brown (UB40) is 57. Actress Sean Young is 55. Pianist Jim Brickman is 53. Rock musician Todd Nance (Widespread Panic) is 52. Actress Ming-Na is 51. Actor Ned Vaughn is 50. Rapper Mike D (The Beastie Boys) is 49. Rapper Sen Dog (Cypress Hill) is 49. Actress Callie Thorne is 45. Actress Sabrina Lloyd is 44. Actor Joel McHale is 43. Actress Marisa Ryan is 40. Country singer Dierks (duhkrs) Bentley is 39. Actor Joshua Gomez is 39. Actress Laura Harris is 38. Olympic gold medal gymnast Dominique Dawes is 38. Country singer Josh Turner is 37. Actress Nadine Velazquez is 36. Actress Andrea Riseborough is 33. Actor Dan Byrd is 29. Actress Ashley Fink (TV: “Glee”) is 28. Rock musician Jared Followill (Kings of Leon) is 28. Actor Cody Linley is 25. Pop musician Michael Clifford (5 Seconds to Summer) is 19.

Thought for Today: “There is no greatness where there is not simplicity.” — Leo Tolstoy, Russian author (1828-1910).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, Nov. 19, the 323rd day of 2014. There are 42 days left in the year.

On Nov. 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln paid tribute to the fallen from the Battle of Gettysburg as he dedicated a national cemetery at the site of the Civil War battlefield in Pennsylvania.

In 1600, King Charles I of England was born in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland.

In 1794, the United States and Britain signed Jay’s Treaty, which resolved some issues left over from the Revolutionary War.

In 1831, the 20th president of the United States, James Garfield, was born in Orange Township, Ohio.

In 1919, the Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles (vehr-SY’) by a vote of 55 in favor, 39 against, short of the two-thirds majority needed for ratification.

In 1942, during World War II, Russian forces launched their winter offensive against the Germans along the Don front.

In 1959, Ford Motor Co. announced it was halting production of the unpopular Edsel.

In 1969, Apollo 12 astronauts Charles Conrad and Alan Bean made the second manned landing on the moon.

In 1977, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat became the first Arab leader to visit Israel.

In 1984, some 500 people died in a firestorm set off by a series of explosions at a petroleum storage plant on the edge of Mexico City.

In 1985, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev met for the first time as they began their summit in Geneva.

In 1990, the pop duo Milli Vanilli were stripped of their Grammy Award because other singers had lent their voices to the “Girl You Know It’s True” album.

In 1997, Iowa seamstress Bobbi McCaughey (mih-KOY’) gave birth to septuplets, four boys and three girls. The space shuttle Columbia zoomed into orbit on a two-week science mission.

Ten years ago: A notorious NBA brawl that came to be known as the “Malice at the Palace” erupted as Ron Artest and Stephen Jackson of the Indiana Pacers charged into the stands and fought with Detroit Pistons fans, forcing officials to end the Pacers’ 97-82 win with 45.9 seconds left. (Artest was suspended for the rest of the season, Jackson for 30 games. Fellow Pacer Jermaine O’Neal, who also was involved, was suspended for 15 games and six other players on both teams received suspensions of at least one game.)

Five years ago: President Barack Obama wrapped up his weeklong Asia trip in South Korea, where he said the United States had begun talking with allies about fresh punishment against Iran for defying efforts to halt its nuclear weapons pursuits. President Hamid Karzai pledged to get tough on corruption and strengthen security in Afghanistan as he started a second five-year term. Artist Jeanne-Claude, who helped create various “wrapping” projects with her husband Christo, died in New York at age 74.

One year ago: Suicide bombers struck the Iranian Embassy in Beirut, killing 23 people, including a diplomat, and injuring more than 140 others. Virginia state Sen. Creigh (kree) Deeds was attacked and stabbed multiple times by his mentally ill adult son, Gus Deeds, who then took his own life. Diane Disney Miller, 79, daughter of Walt Disney and one of his inspirations for building the Disneyland theme park, died in Napa, California. The Disney animated feature “Frozen” had its Hollywood premiere.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Alan Young is 95. Talk show host Larry King is 81. Former General Electric chief executive Jack Welch is 79. Talk show host Dick Cavett is 78. Broadcasting and sports mogul Ted Turner is 76. Singer Pete Moore (Smokey Robinson and the Miracles) is 75. Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, is 75. Actor Dan Haggerty is 73. Former Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson is 73. Fashion designer Calvin Klein is 72. Sportscaster Ahmad Rashad is 65. Actor Robert Beltran is 61. Actress Kathleen Quinlan is 60. Actress Glynnis O’Connor is 59. Broadcast journalist Ann Curry is 58. Former NASA astronaut Eileen Collins is 58. Actress Allison Janney is 55. Rock musician Matt Sorum (Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver) is 54. Actress Meg Ryan is 53. Actress-director Jodie Foster is 52. Actress Terry Farrell is 51. TV chef Rocco DiSpirito is 48. Actor Jason Scott Lee is 48. Olympic gold medal runner Gail Devers is 48. Actress Erika Alexander is 45. Rock musician Travis McNabb is 45. Singer Tony Rich is 43. Actress Sandrine Holt is 42. Country singer Jason Albert (Heartland) is 41. Country singer Billy Currington is 41. Dancer-choreographer Savion Glover is 41. Country musician Chad Jeffers is 39. Rhythm-and-blues singer Tamika Scott (Xscape) is 39. Rhythm-and-blues singer Lil’ Mo is 37. Olympic gold medal gymnast Kerri Strug is 37. Actor Reid Scott is 37. Actress Katherine Kelly (TV: “Mr. Selfridge”) is 35. Actor Adam Driver is 31. Actress Samantha Futerman is 27. Rapper Tyga is 25.

Thought for Today: “The misfortunes hardest to bear are these which never came.” — Christopher Morley, American author and journalist (1890-1957).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, Nov. 18, the 322nd day of 2014. There are 43 days left in the year.

On Nov. 18, 1964, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover described civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. as “the most notorious liar in the country” for allegedly accusing FBI agents in Georgia of failing to act on complaints filed by blacks; King, who denied making such a claim, replied, “I cannot conceive of Mr. Hoover making a statement like this without being under extreme pressure.”

In 1883, the United States and Canada adopted a system of Standard Time zones.

In 1886, the 21st president of the United States, Chester A. Arthur, died in New York.

In 1928, Walt Disney’s first sound-synchronized animated cartoon, “Steamboat Willie” starring Mickey Mouse, premiered in New York.

In 1936, Germany and Italy recognized the Spanish government of Francisco Franco.

In 1942, “The Skin of Our Teeth,” Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning allegory about the history of humankind, opened on Broadway.

In 1959, “Ben-Hur,” the Biblical-era spectacle starring Charlton Heston, had its world premiere in New York.

In 1963, the Bell System introduced the first commercial touch-tone telephone system in Carnegie and Greensburg, Pennsylvania.

In 1966, U.S. Roman Catholic bishops did away with the rule against eating meat on Fridays outside of Lent.

In 1978, U.S. Rep. Leo J. Ryan, D-Calif., and four others were killed in Jonestown, Guyana, by members of the Peoples Temple; the killings were followed by a night of mass murder and suicide by more than 900 cult members.

In 1987, the congressional Iran-Contra committees issued their final report, saying President Ronald Reagan bore “ultimate responsibility” for wrongdoing by his aides. A fire at London King’s Cross railway station claimed 31 lives.

In 1994, bandleader Cab Calloway died in Hockessin, Delaware, at age 86.

In 1999, 12 people were killed when a bonfire under construction at Texas A-and-M University collapsed. A jury in Jasper, Texas, convicted Shawn Allen Berry of murder for his role in the dragging death of James Byrd Jr., but spared him the death penalty. American author and composer Paul Bowles died in Morocco at age 88.

Ten years ago: Former President Bill Clinton’s library opened in Little Rock, Arkansas; in attendance were President George W. Bush, former President George H.W. Bush and former President Jimmy Carter. Former Ku Klux Klansman Bobby Frank Cherry, convicted of killing four black girls in the racially motivated bombing of a Birmingham, Alabama, church in 1963, died in prison at age 74. Britain outlawed fox hunting in England and Wales (Scotland had already abolished hunting). Composer Cy Coleman died in New York at age 75.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama visited the Great Wall of China, which he described as “magical,” before heading to Seoul, South Korea, for the final stop of his eight-day Asia tour. Two days before turning 92, Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va., set a record for longest-serving lawmaker in congressional history at 56 years, 320 days. (That record was broken in 2013 by U.S. Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich.)

One year ago: Toronto’s city council voted to strip scandal-plagued Mayor Rob Ford of many of his powers following a heated debate in which he knocked over a city councilor. NASA’s robotic explorer, Maven, rocketed toward Mars on a quest to unravel the ancient mystery of the red planet’s radical climate change.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Brenda Vaccaro is 75. Author-poet Margaret Atwood is 75. Actress Linda Evans is 72. Actress Susan Sullivan is 72. Country singer Jacky Ward is 68. Actor Jameson Parker is 67. Actress-singer Andrea Marcovicci is 66. Rock musician Herman Rarebell is 65. Singer Graham Parker is 64. Actor Delroy Lindo is 62. Comedian Kevin Nealon is 61. Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Warren Moon is 58. Actor Oscar Nunez is 56. Actress Elizabeth Perkins is 54. Singer Kim Wilde is 54. Rock musician Kirk Hammett (Metallica) is 52. Rock singer Tim DeLaughter (dee-LAW’-ter) is 49. Actor Romany Malco is 46. Actor Owen Wilson is 46. Singer Duncan Sheik is 45. Actor Mike Epps is 44. Actress Peta Wilson is 44. Actress Chloe Sevigny (SEH’-ven-ee) is 40. Country singer Jessi Alexander is 38. Actor Steven Pasquale is 38. Rapper Fabolous is 37. Actor Nate Parker is 35. Rapper Mike Jones is 34. Actress/comedian Nasim Pedrad is 33. Actress Allison Tolman (TV: “Fargo”) is 33. Actor Damon Wayans Jr. is 32. Actor Nathan Kress is 22.

Thought for Today: “Your way of giving is more important than what you give.” — Vietnamese proverb.

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Monday, Nov. 17, the 321st day of 2014. There are 44 days left in the year.

On Nov. 17, 1889, the Union Pacific Railroad Co. began direct, daily railroad service between Chicago and Portland, Oregon, as well as Chicago and San Francisco.

In 1558, Elizabeth I acceded to the English throne upon the death of Queen Mary.

In 1800, Congress held its first session in Washington in the partially completed Capitol building.

In 1869, the Suez Canal opened in Egypt.

In 1917, French sculptor Auguste Rodin (roh-DAN’) died in Meudon at age 77.

In 1934, Lyndon Baines Johnson married Claudia Alta Taylor, better known as Lady Bird, in San Antonio, Texas.

In 1947, President Harry S. Truman, in an address to a special session of Congress, called for emergency aid to Austria, Italy and France. (The aid was approved the following month.)

In 1968, NBC outraged football fans by cutting away from the closing minutes of a New York Jets-Oakland Raiders game to begin the TV special “Heidi” on schedule. (After being taken off the air, the Raiders came from behind to beat the Jets, 43-32.)

In 1973, President Richard Nixon told Associated Press managing editors in Orlando, Florida: “People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook.”

In 1979, Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini ordered the release of 13 black and/or female American hostages being held at the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.

In 1987, a federal jury in Denver convicted two white supremacists of civil rights violations in the 1984 slaying of radio talk show host Alan Berg. (Both men later died in prison.)

In 1989, the Walt Disney animated feature “The Little Mermaid” opened in wide release.

In 1994, the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical “Sunset Boulevard” opened on Broadway with Glenn Close as faded movie star Norma Desmond.

Ten years ago: It was announced that Kmart was acquiring Sears in a surprise $11 billion deal. In Washington state, officials said Republican gubernatorial candidate Dino Rossi led Democratic opponent Christine Gregoire by only 261 votes. (After three counts of the ballots, Gregoire was declared the winner by just 129 votes out of 2.9 million cast.)

Five years ago: President Barack Obama held formal, closed-door talks in Beijing with Chinese President Hu Jintao. Sarah Palin’s autobiography “Going Rogue” was released; 1 million copies sold in less than two weeks.

One year ago: Intense thunderstorms and tornadoes swept across the Midwest, causing extensive damage in several central Illinois communities, killing more than half a dozen people. A Tatarstan Airlines Boeing 737 crashed 450 miles east of Moscow, killing all 50 people on board. Doris Lessing 94, an independent and often irascible author who won the Nobel Prize in 2007, died in London.

Today’s Birthdays: Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., is 80. Rock musician Gerry McGee (The Ventures) is 77. Singer Gordon Lightfoot is 76. Singer-songwriter Bob Gaudio is 73. Movie director Martin Scorsese (skor-SEH’-see) is 72. Actress Lauren Hutton is 71. Actor-director Danny DeVito is 70. “Saturday Night Live” producer Lorne Michaels is 70. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Tom Seaver is 70. Movie director Roland Joffe is 69. Former Democratic National Chairman Howard Dean is 66. House Speaker John Boehner (BAY’-nur) is 65. Actor Stephen Root is 63. Rock musician Jim Babjak (The Smithereens) is 57. Actress Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio is 56. Actor William Moses is 55. Entertainer RuPaul is 54. Actor Dylan Walsh is 51. National Security Adviser Susan Rice is 50. Actress Sophie Marceau is 48. Actress-model Daisy Fuentes is 48. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ronnie DeVoe (New Edition; Bell Biv DeVoe) is 47. Rock musician Ben Wilson (Blues Traveler) is 47. Actor David Ramsey is 43. Actor Leonard Roberts is 42. Actress Leslie Bibb is 41. Actor Brandon Call is 38. Country singer Aaron Lines is 37. Actress Rachel McAdams is 36. Rock musician Isaac Hanson (Hanson) is 34. Actor Justin Cooper is 26. Musician Reid Perry (The Band Perry) is 26. Actress Raquel Castro is 20.

Thought for Today: “The upper classes are merely a nation’s past; the middle class is its future.” — Ayn Rand, Russian-American author (1905-1982).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Sunday, Nov. 16, the 320th day of 2014. There are 45 days left in the year.

On Nov. 16, 1914, the newly created Federal Reserve Banks opened in 12 cities

In 1776, British troops captured Fort Washington in New York during the American Revolution.

In 1885, Canadian rebel leader Louis Riel was executed for high treason.

In 1907, Oklahoma became the 46th state of the union.

In 1917, Georges Clemenceau again became prime minister of France.

In 1933, the United States and the Soviet Union established diplomatic relations.

In 1939, mob boss Al Capone, ill with syphilis, was released from prison after serving 7 1/2 years for tax evasion and failure to file tax returns.

In 1946, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was founded at the conclusion of a conference in London.

In 1959, the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “The Sound of Music” opened on Broadway.

In 1960, Academy Award-winning actor Clark Gable died in Los Angeles at age 59.

In 1966, Dr. Samuel H. Sheppard was acquitted in his second trial of murdering his pregnant wife, Marilyn, in 1954.

In 1973, Skylab 4, carrying a crew of three astronauts, was launched from Cape Canaveral on an 84-day mission.

In 1989, six Jesuit priests, a housekeeper and her daughter were slain by army troops at the University of Central America Jose Simeon Canas in El Salvador.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush picked National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice to be his new secretary of state, succeeding Colin Powell. Al-Jazeera television said it had received a video showing a hooded militant shooting a blindfolded woman in the head; it’s believed the woman was kidnapped British aid worker Margaret Hassan. Sunni Muslims in Iraq expressed anger over videotape showing the fatal shooting of a wounded and apparently unarmed man in a Fallujah mosque by a U.S. Marine. (The Marine Corps decided not to court-martial the unidentified corporal.)

Five years ago: President Barack Obama, on his first-ever trip to China, gave his hosts a pointed, unexpected nudge to stop censoring Internet access, but the message was not widely heard in China, where the president’s words were blocked online and shown on only one regional television channel. A U.S. government health task force suggested most women wait until age 50 to get mammograms, conflicting with the American Cancer Society’s advice to start at 40. Space shuttle Atlantis blasted off with six astronauts and a full load of spare parts for the International Space Station. Actor Edward Woodward, 79, died in Cornwall, England.

One year ago: In his weekly Saturday radio and Internet address, President Barack Obama said improved energy efficiency and higher energy production in the United States were yielding environmental and economic benefits that were helping ensure cleaner air and a more competitive business landscape.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Clu Gulager is 86. Journalist Elizabeth Drew is 79. Blues musician W.C. Clark is 75. Actress Joanna Pettet is 72. Actor Steve Railsback is 69. Actor David Leisure is 64. Actor Miguel Sandoval is 63. Actress Marg Helgenberger is 56. Rock musician Mani is 52. Country singer-musician Keith Burns (Trick Pony) is 51. Tennis player Zina Garrison is 51. Former MLB All-Star pitcher Dwight Gooden is 50. Jazz singer Diana Krall is 50. Actor Harry Lennix is 50. Rock musician Dave Kushner (Velvet Revolver) is 48. Actress Lisa Bonet (boh-NAY’) is 47. Actress Tammy Lauren is 46. Rhythm-and-blues singer Bryan Abrams (Color Me Badd) is 45. Actress Martha Plimpton is 44. Actor Michael Irby is 42. Actress Missi Pyle is 42. Olympic gold medal figure skater Oksana Baiul (ahk-SAH’-nah by-OOL’) is 37. Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal (JIHL’-ehn-hahl) is 37. Pop singer Trevor Penick is 35. NBA player Amare Stoudemire is 32. Actress Kimberly J. Brown is 30. Rock singer Siva Kaneswaran (The Wanted) is 26. Actor Casey Moss (TV: “Days of Our Lives”) is 21. Actor Noah Gray-Cabey is 19.

Thought for Today: “History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies.” — Alexis de Tocqueville, French historian (1805-1859).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Friday, Nov. 7, the 311th day of 2014. There are 54 days left in the year.

On Nov. 7, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented fourth term in office, defeating Republican Thomas E. Dewey.

In 1861, former U.S. President John Tyler was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives (however, Tyler died before he could take his seat).

In 1914, the first issue of The New Republic magazine was published, presenting itself as “A Journal of Opinion which Seeks to Meet the Challenge of a New Time.”

In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress.

In 1917, Russia’s Bolshevik Revolution took place as forces led by Vladimir Ilyich Lenin overthrew the provisional government of Alexander Kerensky.

In 1940, Washington state’s original Tacoma Narrows Bridge, nicknamed “Galloping Gertie,” collapsed into Puget Sound during a windstorm.

In 1954, the CBS News program “Face the Nation” premiered with Ted Koop as host; the guest was Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis.

In 1962, Republican Richard Nixon, having lost California’s gubernatorial race, held what he called his “last press conference,” telling reporters, “You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore.” Former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt, 78, died in New York City.

In 1972, President Richard Nixon was re-elected in a landslide over Democrat George McGovern.

In 1973, Congress overrode President Richard Nixon’s veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s power to wage war without congressional approval.

In 1974, British peer Richard John Bingham, 7th Earl of Lucan, disappeared after his children’s nanny, Sandra Rivett, was bludgeoned to death at his family’s London home; he has not been seen since.

In 1980, actor Steve McQueen died in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, at age 50.

In 1989, L. Douglas Wilder won the governor’s race in Virginia, becoming the first elected black governor in U.S. history; David N. Dinkins was elected New York City’s first black mayor.

Ten years ago: France rolled out overwhelming military force to put down an explosion of anti-French violence in Ivory Coast, its former West African colony. In the New York City Marathon, Britain’s Paula Radcliffe won the women’s race in 2:23:10, edging Kenya’s Susan Chepkemei by only four seconds; South Africa’s Hendrik Ramaala won the men’s race in 2:09:28. Actor and musical star Howard Keel died at age 85.

Five years ago: In a victory for President Barack Obama, the Democratic-controlled House narrowly passed, 220-215, landmark health care legislation to expand coverage to tens of millions lacking it and place tough new restrictions on the insurance industry. David Haye won the WBA heavyweight title with a majority decision over Nikolai Valuev in Nuremberg, Germany.

One year ago: Seeking to calm a growing furor, President Barack Obama told NBC News he was “sorry” Americans were losing health insurance plans that he repeatedly had said they could keep under his health care law, but he stopped short of apologizing for making those promises in the first place. The Food and Drug Administration announced it was requiring the food industry to phase out artery-clogging trans fats. Shares of Twitter went on sale to the public for the first time; by the closing bell, the social network was valued at $31 billion. A Russian spacecraft carrying the Olympic torch and three astronauts docked with the International Space Station ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi.

Today’s Birthdays: Evangelist Billy Graham is 96. Actor Barry Newman is 76. Singer Johnny Rivers is 72. Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is 71. Former CIA Director David Petraeus is 62. Actor Christopher Knight (TV: “The Brady Bunch”) is 57. Rock musician Tommy Thayer (KISS) is 54. Actress Julie Pinson is 47. Rock musician Greg Tribbett (Mudvayne) is 46. Actor Christopher Daniel Barnes is 42. Actors Jason and Jeremy London are 42. Actress Yunjin Kim is 41. Actor Adam DeVine is 31. Rock musician Zach Myers (Shinedown) is 31. Actor Lucas Neff is 29. Rapper Tinie (TY’-nee) Tempah is 26. Rock singer Lorde is 18.

Thought for Today: “Man cannot live by incompetence alone.” — Charlotte Whitton, Canadian feminist (1896-1975).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Thursday, Oct. 30, the 303rd day of 2014. There are 62 days left in the year.

On Oct. 30, 1974, Muhammad Ali knocked out George Foreman in the eighth round of a 15-round bout in Kinshasa, Zaire (zah-EER’), known as the “Rumble in the Jungle,” to regain his world heavyweight title.

In 1735, the second president of the United States, John Adams, was born in Braintree, Massachusetts.

In 1864, Helena, Montana, was founded.

In 1921, the silent film classic “The Sheik,” starring Rudolph Valentino, premiered in Los Angeles.

In 1938, the radio play “The War of the Worlds,” starring Orson Welles, aired on CBS.

In 1944, the Martha Graham ballet “Appalachian Spring,” with music by Aaron Copland, premiered at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., with Graham in a leading role.

In 1945, the U.S. government announced the end of shoe rationing, effective at midnight.

In 1953, Gen. George C. Marshall was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Dr. Albert Schweitzer received the Peace Prize for 1952.

In 1961, the Soviet Union tested a hydrogen bomb, the “Tsar Bomba,” with a force estimated at about 50 megatons. The Soviet Party Congress unanimously approved a resolution ordering the removal of Josef Stalin’s body from Lenin’s tomb.

In 1972, 45 people were killed when an Illinois Central Gulf commuter train was struck from behind by another train in Chicago’s South Side.

In 1984, police in Poland found the body of kidnapped pro-Solidarity priest Father Jerzy Popieluszko (YEHR’-zee pah-pee-WOOSH’-goh), whose death was blamed on security officers.

In 1989, Mitsubishi Estate Co. announced it was buying 51 percent of Rockefeller Group Inc. of New York. (However, amid a real estate slump, Mitsubishi ended up walking away from its investment in 1995.)

In 1997, a jury in Cambridge, Massachusetts, convicted British au pair Louise Woodward of second-degree murder in the death of eight-month-old Matthew Eappen. (The judge, Hiller B. Zobel, later reduced the verdict to manslaughter and set Woodward free.)

Ten years ago: The decapitated body of a 24-year-old Japanese backpacker (Shosei Koda) was found wrapped in an American flag in northwestern Baghdad; the militant group led by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi later claimed responsibility. Grateful fans embraced the World Series champion Boston Red Sox, hailing the team as heroes during a jubilant parade. Actress-dancer Peggy Ryan died in Las Vegas at age 80.

Five years ago: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton was confronted repeatedly by Pakistanis as she ended a tense three-day tour of the country, chastised by one woman who said a U.S. program using aerial drones to target terrorists amounted to “executions without trial.” Michelle Triola Marvin, who’d fought a landmark “palimony” case in the 1970s against former lover Lee Marvin, died in Malibu, California, at age 76.

One year ago: President Barack Obama claimed “full responsibility” for fixing his administration’s troubled health insurance website, while on Capitol Hill, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius apologized to frustrated people trying to sign up, declaring that she was accountable for the failures but also defending the historic health care overhaul. The government said the deficit for the 2013 budget year totaled $680.3 billion, down from $1.09 trillion in 2012. The Boston Red Sox romped to their third World Series championship in 10 seasons, thumping the St. Louis Cardinals 6-1 in Game 6 at Fenway.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Dick Gautier is 77. Movie director Claude Lelouch is 77. Rock singer Grace Slick is 75. Songwriter Eddie Holland is 75. Rhythm-and-blues singer Otis Williams (The Temptations) is 73. Actress Joanna Shimkus is 71. Actor Henry Winkler is 69. Broadcast journalist Andrea Mitchell is 68. Rock musician Chris Slade (Asia) is 68. Country/rock musician Timothy B. Schmit (The Eagles) is 67. Actor Leon Rippy is 65. Actor Harry Hamlin is 63. Actor Charles Martin Smith is 61. Country singer T. Graham Brown is 60. Actor Kevin Pollak is 57. Actor Michael Beach is 51. Rock singer-musician Gavin Rossdale (Bush) is 47. Actor Jack Plotnick is 46. Comedian Ben Bailey is 44. Actress Nia Long is 44. Country singer Kassidy Osborn (SHeDAISY) (sh-DAY’-zee) is 38. Actor Gael Garcia Bernal is 36. Actor Matthew Morrison is 36. Actor Shaun Sipos (SEE’-pohs) is 33. Ivanka Trump is 33. Actress Janel (juh-NEHL’) Parrish is 26. Actor Tequan Richmond is 22.

Thought for Today: “All men are almost led to believe not of proof, but by attraction.” — Blaise Pascal, French philosopher (1623-1662).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Thursday, Oct. 23, the 296th day of 2014. There are 69 days left in the year.

On Oct. 23, 1944, the World War II Battle of Leyte (LAY’-tee) Gulf began, resulting in a major Allied victory against Japanese forces.

In 1707, the first Parliament of Great Britain, created by the Acts of Union between England and Scotland, held its first meeting.

In 1864, forces led by Union Maj. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis repelled Confederate Maj. Gen. Sterling Price’s army in the Civil War Battle of Westport in Missouri.

In 1915, tens of thousands of women marched in New York City, demanding the right to vote.

In 1935, mobster Dutch Schultz, 34, was shot and mortally wounded with three other men during a gangland hit at the Palace Chophouse in Newark, New Jersey. (Schultz died the following day.)

In 1942, during World War II, Britain launched a major offensive against Axis forces at El Alamein (el ah-lah-MAYN’) in Egypt, resulting in an Allied victory.

In 1954, West Germany was invited to join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, which it did the following year.

In 1956, a student-sparked revolt against Hungary’s Communist rule began; as the revolution spread, Soviet forces started entering the country, and the uprising was put down within weeks.

In 1972, the musical “Pippin” opened on Broadway.

In 1983, 241 U.S. service members, most of them Marines, were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport in Lebanon; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces killed 58 paratroopers.

In 1984, BBC Television reported on the famine in Ethiopia; the story, which shocked viewers, prompted rock star Bob Geldof to organize “Band Aid,” a group of celebrities who recorded the song “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” for charity.

In 1989, 23 people were killed in an explosion at Phillips Petroleum Co.’s chemical complex in Pasadena, Texas. In a case that inflamed racial tensions in Boston, Charles Stuart claimed that he and his pregnant wife, Carol, had been shot in their car by a black robber. (Carol Stuart and her prematurely delivered baby died; Charles Stuart later died, an apparent suicide, after he himself was implicated.)

In 2002, gunmen seized a crowded Moscow theater, taking hundreds hostage and threatening to kill their captives unless the Russian army pulled out of Chechnya. (Three days later, special forces stormed the theater; 130 captives died, along with all 40 gunmen.)

Ten years ago: Gunmen ambushed a group of U.S.-trained Iraqi soldiers east of Baghdad; around 50 of the unarmed soldiers were killed execution-style. A 6.8 magnitude earthquake in northern Japan killed 40 people. Brazil launched its first rocket into space, 14 months after an accident killed 21 space agency employees. The Boston Red Sox took Game 1 of the World Series, defeating the St. Louis Cardinals 11-9. Singer Ashlee Simpson, performing on NBC’s “Saturday Night Live,” was tripped up when the backing track for a different song featuring her voice began to play, prompting accusations of lip-synching. Opera singer Robert Merrill, 87, died in New Rochelle, New York.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama declared the swine flu outbreak a national emergency, giving his health chief the power to let hospitals move emergency rooms offsite to speed treatment and protect noninfected patients. Bank closings for 2009 surpassed 100, hitting 106 by day’s end. The NBA and the referees union agreed on a two-year contract, ending a lockout of more than a month. Character actor Lou Jacobi died in New York at age 95. Shiloh Pepin, 10, a girl who was born with fused legs, a rare condition often called “mermaid syndrome,” died in Portland, Maine.

One year ago: A defensive Obama administration acknowledged its problem-plagued health insurance website didn’t get enough testing before going live; it said technicians were deep into the job of fixing major computer snags, but provided no timetable. German Chancellor Angela Merkel called President Barack Obama to complain about allegations U.S. intelligence had targeted her cellphone. (The White House said it wasn’t monitoring and wouldn’t monitor Merkel’s communications, but conspicuously didn’t say they had never been monitored.) The Boston Red Sox took the World Series opener, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 8-1.

Today’s Birthdays: Baseball Hall of Famer and former U.S. Senator Jim Bunning, R-Ky., is 83. Movie director Philip Kaufman is 78. Soccer great Pele (pay-lay) is 74. Rhythm-and-blues singer Barbara Ann Hawkins (The Dixie Cups) is 71. ABC News investigative reporter Brian Ross is 66. Actor Michael Rupert is 63. Movie director Ang Lee is 60. Jazz singer Dianne Reeves is 58. Country singer Dwight Yoakam is 58. Community activist Martin Luther King III is 57. Movie director Sam Raimi is 55. Parodist “Weird Al” Yankovic is 55. Rock musician Robert Trujillo (Metallica) is 50. Christian/jazz singer David Thomas (Take 6) is 48. Rock musician Brian Nevin (Big Head Todd and the Monsters) is 48. Country singer-musician Junior Bryant is 46. Actor Jon Huertas is 45. Movie director Chris Weitz is 45. CNN medical reporter Dr. Sanjay Gupta is 45. Country singer Jimmy Wayne is 42. Actress Vivian Bang is 41. Rock musician Eric Bass (Shinedown) is 40. TV personality and host Cat Deeley is 38. Actor Ryan Reynolds is 38. Rock singer Matthew Shultz (Cage the Elephant) is 31. Rhythm-and-blues singer Miguel is 29. Actress Masiela Lusha (MAH’-see-ella loo-SHA’) is 29. Actress Emilia Clarke (TV: “Game of Thrones”) is 28. Actress Briana Evigan is 28. Actress Jessica Stroup is 28.

Thought for Today: “Be content with what you are, and wish not change; nor dread your last day, nor long for it.” — Marcus Aurelius, Roman emperor (CE 121-CE 180).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, Oct. 22, the 295th day of 2014. There are 70 days left in the year.

On Oct. 22, 1934, bank robber Charles “Pretty Boy” Floyd was shot to death by federal agents and local police at a farm near East Liverpool, Ohio.

In 1746, Princeton University was first chartered as the College of New Jersey.

In 1797, French balloonist Andre-Jacques Garnerin (gahr-nayr-AN’) made the first parachute descent, landing safely from a height of about 3,000 feet over Paris.

In 1836, Sam Houston was inaugurated as the first constitutionally elected president of the Republic of Texas.

In 1883, the original Metropolitan Opera House in New York held its grand opening with a performance of Gounod’s “Faust.”

In 1928, Republican presidential nominee Herbert Hoover spoke of the “American system of rugged individualism” in a speech at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

In 1953, the Franco-Lao Treaty of Amity and Association effectively made Laos an independent member of the French Union.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy revealed the presence of Soviet-built missile bases under construction in Cuba and announced a quarantine of all offensive military equipment being shipped to the Communist island nation.

In 1964, Jean-Paul Sartre was named winner of the Nobel Prize in literature, even though the French writer had said he would decline the award.

In 1979, the U.S. government allowed the deposed Shah of Iran to travel to New York for medical treatment — a decision that precipitated the Iran hostage crisis. French conductor and music teacher Nadia Boulanger died in Paris.

In 1981, the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization was decertified by the federal government for its strike the previous August.

In 1986, President Ronald Reagan signed into law sweeping tax-overhaul legislation.

In 1991, the European Community and the European Free Trade Association concluded a landmark accord to create a free trade zone of 19 nations by 1993.

Ten years ago: In a wrenching videotaped statement, aid worker Margaret Hassan, kidnapped in Baghdad, begged the British government to help save her by withdrawing its troops from Iraq, saying these “might be my last hours.” (Hassan was apparently killed by her captors a month later.) President George W. Bush signed a corporate tax overhaul to close loopholes and provide $136 billion in new tax breaks for businesses, farmers and others.

Five years ago: Mortars fired by Islamic militants slammed into Somalia’s airport as President Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed boarded a plane, sparking battles that killed at least 24 people; the president was unhurt. Gunmen kidnapped Gauthier Lefevre, a French staff member working for the International Committee of the Red Cross, in Sudan’s western Darfur region. (Lefevre was released in March 2010.) Comedian Soupy Sales died in New York at age 83.

One year ago: The United States defended drone strikes targeting al-Qaida operatives and others, rejecting reports by Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International questioning the legality of attacks that the groups asserted had killed or wounded scores of civilians in Yemen and Pakistan.

Today’s Birthdays: Black Panthers co-founder Bobby Seale is 78. Actor Christopher Lloyd is 76. Actor Derek Jacobi is 76. Actor Tony Roberts is 75. Movie director Jan (yahn) de Bont is 71. Actress Catherine Deneuve is 71. Rock musician Leslie West (Mountain) is 69. Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour is 67. Actor Jeff Goldblum is 62. Rock musician Greg Hawkes is 62. Movie director Bill Condon is 59. Actor Luis Guzman is 57. Actor-writer-producer Todd Graff is 55. Rock musician Cris Kirkwood is 54. Actor-comedian Bob Odenkirk is 52. Olympic gold medal figure skater Brian Boitano is 51. Christian singer TobyMac is 50. Singer-songwriter John Wesley Harding is 49. Actress Valeria Golino is 48. Comedian Carlos Mencia is 47. Country singer Shelby Lynne is 46. Reggae rapper Shaggy is 46. Movie director Spike Jonze is 45. Rapper Tracey Lee is 44. Actress Saffron Burrows is 42. MLB player Ichiro Suzuki is 41. Actor Jesse Tyler Ferguson is 39. Christian rock singer-musician Jon Foreman (Switchfoot) is 38. Actor Michael Fishman is 33. Talk show host Michael Essany is 32. Rock musician Rickard (correct) Goransson (Carolina Liar) is 31. Rock musician Zac Hanson (Hanson) is 29. Actor Jonathan Lipnicki is 24. Actress Sofia Vassilieva (vas-ihl-lee-A’-vuh) is 22.

Thought for Today: “There is no such thing as notoriety in the United States these days, let alone infamy. Celebrity is all.” — Christopher Hitchens, Anglo-American author and essayist (1949-2011).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 21, the 294th day of 2014. There are 71 days left in the year.

On Oct. 21, 1944, during World War II, U.S. troops captured the German city of Aachen (AH’-kuhn).

In 1797, the U.S. Navy frigate Constitution, also known as “Old Ironsides,” was christened in Boston’s harbor.

In 1805, a British fleet commanded by Adm. Horatio Nelson defeated a French-Spanish fleet in the Battle of Trafalgar; Nelson, however, was killed.

In 1879, Thomas Edison perfected a workable electric light at his laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

In 1917, members of the 1st Division of the U.S. Army training in Luneville (luhn-nay-VEEL’), France, became the first Americans to see action on the front lines of World War I.

In 1945, women in France were allowed to vote in parliamentary elections for the first time.

In 1959, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, opened to the public in New York.

In 1960, Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon clashed in their fourth and final presidential debate in New York.

In 1964, the movie musical “My Fair Lady,” starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison, had its world premiere at the Criterion Theater in New York.

In 1967, the Israeli destroyer INS Eilat was sunk by Egyptian missile boats near Port Said (sah-EED’); 47 Israeli crew members were lost.

In 1971, President Richard Nixon nominated Lewis F. Powell and William H. Rehnquist to the U.S. Supreme Court. (Both nominees were confirmed.)

In 1986, pro-Iranian kidnappers in Lebanon abducted American Edward Tracy (he was released in August 1991).

In 1991, American hostage Jesse Turner was freed by his kidnappers in Lebanon after nearly five years in captivity.

Ten years ago: An Associated Press poll found President George W. Bush and his opponent, Sen. John Kerry, locked in a statistical tie for the popular vote. Emerson College student Victoria Snelgrove, 21, died hours after being shot in the eye with a pepper-spray pellet fired by police trying to control a raucous crowd outside Fenway Park, where the Boston Red Sox had won the American League championship. The St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Houston Astros 5-2 to take Game 7 of the National League championship and advance to the World Series.

Five years ago: Northwest Airlines Flight 188, an Airbus A320, flew past the Minneapolis airport by more than 100 miles before turning around and landing safely; the pilots later said they’d been distracted while talking about their schedules. Authorities found the body of missing Florida 7-year-old Somer Thompson in a Georgia landfill (Jarred Harrell later pleaded guilty to kidnapping, rape and murder, and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole). Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jack Nelson of the Los Angeles Times died in Bethesda, Maryland, at 80. The Philadelphia Phillies beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 10-4 in Game 5 of the National League Championship Series to win their second straight NL pennant.

One year ago: A seventh-grader at Sparks Middle School in Sparks, Nevada, shot and killed a teacher and wounded two classmates before taking his own life. Same-sex weddings began in New Jersey, the 14th state to recognize nuptials between gay partners. The San Francisco Bay Area’s main commuter train system and its unions reached a tentative agreement on a new contract.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Joyce Randolph is 90. Author Ursula K. Le Guin is 85. Rock singer Manfred Mann is 74. Musician Steve Cropper (Booker T. & the MG’s) is 73. Singer Elvin Bishop is 72. TV’s Judge Judy Sheindlin is 72. Actor Everett McGill is 69. Musician Lee Loughnane (LAHK’-nayn) (Chicago) is 68. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is 65. Actress LaTanya Richardson Jackson is 65. Musician Charlotte Caffey (The Go-Go’s) is 61. Movie director Catherine Hardwicke is 59. Actress-author Carrie Fisher is 58. Singer Julian Cope is 57. Rock musician Steve Lukather (Toto) is 57. Actor Ken Watanabe (wah-tah-NAH’-bee) is 55. Actress Melora Walters is 54. Rock musician Che (chay) Colovita Lemon is 44. Rock singer-musician Nick Oliveri (Mondo Generator) is 43. Christian rock musician Charlie Lowell (Jars of Clay) is 41. Actor Jeremy Miller is 38. Actor Will Estes is 36. Actor Michael McMillian is 36. Reality TV star Kim Kardashian (kahr-DASH’-ee-uhn) is 34. Actor Matt Dallas is 32. Actress Charlotte Sullivan (TV: “Rookie Blue”) is 31. Actor Aaron Tveit (tuh-VAYT’) is 31.

Thought for Today: “There are different kinds of wrong. The people sinned against are not always the best.” — Dame Ivy Compton-Burnett, English author (1892-1969q).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 14, the 287th day of 2014. There are 78 days left in the year.

On Oct. 14, 1964, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev was toppled from power; he was succeeded by Leonid Brezhnev as first secretary and by Alexei Kosygin as premier. Inventor Robert Moog (mohg) presented his prototype electronic music synthesizer to a meeting of the Audio Engineering Society in New York.

In 1066, Normans under William the Conqueror defeated the English at the Battle of Hastings.

In 1586, Mary, Queen of Scots, went on trial in England, accused of committing treason against Queen Elizabeth I. (Mary was beheaded in February 1587.)

In 1890, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, was born in Denison, Texas.

In 1908, the E.M. Forster novel “A Room With a View” was first published by Edward Arnold of London.

In 1912, former President Theodore Roosevelt, campaigning for the White House as the Progressive (“Bull Moose”) candidate, went ahead with a speech in Milwaukee after being shot in the chest by New York saloonkeeper John Schrank, declaring, “It takes more than one bullet to kill a bull moose.”

In 1939, a German U-boat torpedoed and sank the HMS Royal Oak, a British battleship anchored at Scapa Flow in Scotland’s Orkney Islands; 833 of the more than 1,200 men aboard were killed.

In 1944, German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel committed suicide rather than face trial and certain execution for allegedly conspiring against Adolf Hitler.

In 1947, Air Force test pilot Charles E. (“Chuck”) Yeager (YAY’-gur) broke the sound barrier as he flew the experimental Bell XS-1 (later X-1) rocket plane over Muroc Dry Lake in California.

In 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy suggested the idea of a Peace Corps while addressing an audience of students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

In 1977, singer Bing Crosby died outside Madrid, Spain, at age 74.

In 1987, a 58-hour drama began in Midland, Texas, as 18-month-old Jessica McClure slid 22 feet down an abandoned well at a private day care center; she was rescued on Oct. 16.

In 1994, the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to PLO leader Yasser Arafat, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres. Kidnapped Israeli soldier Nachshon Waxman was killed when Israeli commandos raided the West Bank hideout of Islamic militants. Nobel Prize-winning writer Naguib Mahfouz was stabbed several times on a Cairo street; Muslim militants were blamed in the attack.

Ten years ago: The Treasury Department announced that the federal deficit had surged to a then-record $413 billion in fiscal 2004. A suicide bomber killed six people, including four Americans, in the U.S.-guarded “Green Zone” of Baghdad.

Five years ago: The Unification Church held the largest mass wedding in a decade, with some 40,000 people participating in dozens of cities around the world. NASCAR founder Bill France Sr. headlined the five inductees into the first Hall of Fame class; Richard Petty, Dale Earnhardt, Bill France Jr. and Junior Johnson were the others. Actress Collin Wilcox-Paxton, who’d played Mayella Ewell in the movie classic “To Kill a Mockingbird,” died in Highlands, North Carolina, at age 74. Pro wrestler Lou Albano, 76, died in Westchester County, New York.

One year ago: Americans Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen of the University of Chicago and Robert Shiller of Yale University were named recipients of the Nobel prize in economics. The Los Angeles Dodgers won their first game of the NL championship series, beating the St. Louis Cardinals 3-0 in Game 3.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Roger Moore is 87. Classical pianist Gary Graffman is 86. Movie director Carroll Ballard is 77. Former White House counsel John W. Dean III is 76. Country singer Melba Montgomery is 77. Fashion designer Ralph Lauren is 75. Singer Sir Cliff Richard is 74. Actor Udo Kier is 70. Singer-musician Justin Hayward (The Moody Blues) is 68. Actor Harry Anderson is 62. Actor Greg Evigan is 61. TV personality Arleen Sorkin is 59. World Golf Hall of Famer Beth Daniel is 58. Singer-musician Thomas Dolby is 56. Actress Lori Petty is 51. MLB manager Joe Girardi is 50. Actor Steve Coogan is 49. Singer Karyn White is 49. Actor Edward Kerr is 48. Actor Jon Seda is 44. Country musician Doug Virden is 44. Country singer Natalie Maines (The Dixie Chicks) is 40. Actress-singer Shaznay Lewis (All Saints) is 39. Singer Usher is 36. TV personality Stacy Keibler is 35. Actor Ben Whishaw is 34. Actor Jordan Brower is 33. Director Benh Zeitlin is 32. Actress Skyler Shaye is 28. Actor-comedian Jay Pharoah (TV: “Saturday Night Live”) is 27.

Thought for Today: “Almost anybody can learn to think or believe or know, but not a single human being can be taught to feel.” — E.E. Cummings, American poet (born this date in 1894, died 1962).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Monday, Oct. 13, the 286th day of 2014. There are 79 days left in the year.

  • This is the Columbus Day holiday in the U.S., as well as Thanksgiving Day in Canada.*

On Oct. 13, 1914, the Boston Braves swept the World Series, defeating the Philadelphia Athletics 3-1 in Game 4 played at Fenway Park.

In A.D. 54, Roman Emperor Claudius I died, poisoned apparently at the behest of his wife, Agrippina (ag-rih-PEE’-nuh).

In 1307, King Philip IV of France ordered the arrests of Knights Templar on charges of heresy.

In 1775, the United States Navy had its origins as the Continental Congress ordered the construction of a naval fleet.

In 1792, the cornerstone of the executive mansion, later known as the White House, was laid during a ceremony in the District of Columbia.

In 1843, the Jewish organization B’nai B’rith (buh-NAY’ brith) was founded in New York City.

In 1932, President Herbert Hoover and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes laid the cornerstone for the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington.

In 1944, during World War II, American troops entered Aachen, Germany.

In 1957, CBS-TV broadcast “The Edsel Show,” a one-hour live special starring Bing Crosby designed to promote the new, ill-fated Ford automobile. (It was the first special to use videotape technology to delay the broadcast to the West Coast.)

In 1962, Edward Albee’s four-character drama “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” opened on Broadway.

In 1974, longtime television host Ed Sullivan died in New York City at age 73.

In 1981, voters in Egypt participated in a referendum to elect Vice President Hosni Mubarak (HAHS’-nee moo-BAH’-rahk) the new president, one week after the assassination of Anwar Sadat.

In 1999, the Senate rejected the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, with 48 senators voting in favor and 51 against, far short of the 67 needed for ratification. In Boulder, Colorado, the JonBenet Ramsey grand jury was dismissed after 13 months of work with prosecutors saying there wasn’t enough evidence to charge anyone in the 6-year-old beauty queen’s slaying.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush and Democratic rival John Kerry held their third and final debate in Tempe, Arizona, trading blows on the Iraq war, taxes, gun control, abortion and jobs.

Five years ago: The United Nations Security Council voted unanimously to extend the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Haiti for a year. Singer Al Martino, who’d played crooner Johnny Fontane in “The Godfather” and “The Godfather: Part III,” died in Springfield, Pennsylvania, six days after turning 82. Movie producer Daniel Melnick (“Straw Dogs,” ”Network,” ”Midnight Express”) died in Los Angeles at age 77.

One year ago: Gunmen abducted six Red Cross workers and a Syrian Red Crescent volunteer after stopping their convoy in northwestern Syria. (Four of the seven were released by the next day.) The Boston Red Sox beat the Detroit Tigers 6-5 to even the AL championship series at 1-all. Dennis Kimetto broke the course mark in capturing the Chicago Marathon in 2 hours, 3 minutes, 45 seconds, leading a 1-2-3 finish for Kenyan men.

Today’s Birthdays: Playwright Frank D. Gilroy is 89. Gospel singer Shirley Caesar is 77. Actress Melinda Dillon is 75. Singer-musician Paul Simon is 73. Actress Pamela Tiffin is 72. Musician Robert Lamm (Chicago) is 70. Country singer Lacy J. Dalton is 68. Actor Demond Wilson is 68. Singer-musician Sammy Hagar is 67. Actor John Lone is 62. Model Beverly Johnson is 62. Producer-writer Chris Carter is 58. Actor Reggie Theus (THEE’-us) is 57. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., is 56. Singer Marie Osmond is 55. Rock singer Joey Belladonna is 54. Former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer is 54. NBA coach Doc Rivers is 53. Actress T’Keyah Crystal Keymah (tuh-KEE’-ah KRYS’-tal kee-MAH’) is 52. College and Pro Football Hall of Famer Jerry Rice is 52. Actress Kelly Preston is 52. Country singer John Wiggins is 52. Actor Christopher Judge is 50. Actor Matt Walsh (TV: “Veep”) is 50. Actress Kate Walsh is 47. Rhythm-and-blues musician Jeff Allen (Mint Condition) is 46. Actress Tisha Campbell-Martin is 46. Classical singer Carlos Marin (Il Divo) is 46. Olympic silver-medal figure skater Nancy Kerrigan is 45. Country singer Rhett Akins is 45. Classical crossover singer Paul Potts (TV: “Britain’s Got Talent”) is 44. TV personality Billy Bush is 43. Actor Sacha Baron Cohen is 43. Rock musician Jan Van Sichem Jr. (K’s Choice) is 42. Rhythm-and-blues singers Brian and Brandon Casey (Jagged Edge) are 39. Actress Kiele Sanchez is 38. NBA All-Star Paul Pierce is 37. Singer Ashanti (ah-SHAHN’-tee) is 34. Christian rock singer Jon Micah Sumrall (Kutless) is 34. Olympic gold medal swimmer Ian Thorpe is 32.

Thought for Today: “Do you know the difference between education and experience? Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don’t.” — Pete Seeger, American folk singer and activist (1919-2014).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Friday, Oct. 10, the 283rd day of 2014. There are 82 days left in the year.

On Oct. 10, 1964, the Summer Olympics were opened in Tokyo by Japanese Emperor Hirohito; it was the first time the games were held in Asia.

In 1845, the U.S. Naval Academy was established in Annapolis, Maryland.

In 1913, the Panama Canal was effectively completed as President Woodrow Wilson sent a signal from the White House by telegraph, setting off explosives that destroyed a section of the Gamboa dike.

In 1914, “The Missouri Waltz” by John Valentine Eppel was first published.

In 1935, the George Gershwin opera “Porgy and Bess,” featuring an all-black cast, opened on Broadway; it ran for 124 performances.

In 1938, Nazi Germany completed its annexation of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland (soo-DAYT’-uhn-land).

In 1943, Chiang Kai-shek took the oath of office as president of China.

In 1957, President Dwight D. Eisenhower apologized to the finance minister of Ghana, Komla Agbeli Gbdemah, after the official was refused seating in a Howard Johnson’s restaurant near Dover, Delaware.

In 1964, entertainer Eddie Cantor, 72, died in Beverly Hills, California.

In 1967, the Outer Space Treaty, prohibiting the placing of weapons of mass destruction on the moon or elsewhere in space, entered into force.

In 1970, Quebec Labor Minister Pierre Laporte was kidnapped by the Quebec Liberation Front, a militant separatist group. (Laporte’s body was found a week later.) Fiji became independent after nearly a century of British rule.

In 1973, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, accused of accepting bribes, pleaded no contest to one count of federal income tax evasion and resigned his office.

In 1985, U.S. fighter jets forced an Egyptian plane carrying the hijackers of the Italian cruise ship Achille Lauro (ah-KEE’-leh LOW’-roh) to land in Italy, where the gunmen were taken into custody. Actor-director Orson Welles died in Los Angeles at age 70; actor Yul Brynner died in New York at age 65.

Ten years ago: Christopher Reeve, the “Superman” of celluloid who became a quadriplegic after a May 1995 horse riding accident, died in Mount Kisco, New York, at age 52. Ken Caminiti, the National League’s 1996 most valuable player who later admitted using steroids during his Major League baseball career, died in New York at age 41.

Five years ago: Turkey and Armenia signed a landmark agreement to establish diplomatic relations and open their sealed border after a century of enmity. President Barack Obama, addressing the Human Rights Campaign, restated his campaign pledge to allow homosexual men and women to serve openly in the military. Stephen Gately, 33, a singer with the Irish boy band Boyzone, died while vacationing on the Spanish island of Mallorca (mah-YOHR’-kah).

One year ago: Gunmen from one of Libya’s many militias stormed a hotel where Prime Minister Ali Zidan had a residence and held him for several hours. Kwame Kilpatrick, a former Democratic mayor of Detroit, was sent to federal prison to serve a 28-year sentence for widespread corruption that occurred under his watch. Scott Carpenter, 88, the second American to orbit the Earth and one of the last surviving Mercury 7 astronauts, died in Denver.

Today’s Birthdays: Former Illinois Sen. Adlai Stevenson III is 84. Actor Peter Coyote is 73. Entertainer Ben Vereen is 68. Singer John Prine is 68. Actor Charles Dance is 68. Rock singer-musician Cyril Neville (The Neville Brothers) is 66. Actress Jessica Harper is 65. Author Nora Roberts (aka “J.D. Robb”) is 64. Singer-musician Midge Ure is 61. Rock singer David Lee Roth is 60. Actor J. Eddie Peck is 56. Country singer Tanya Tucker is 56. Actress Julia Sweeney is 55. Actor Bradley Whitford is 55. Musician Martin Kemp is 53. Rock musician Jim Glennie (James) is 51. Actress Rebecca Pidgeon is 49. Rock musician Mike Malinin (mah-LIHN’-ihn) (Goo Goo Dolls) is 47. NFL quarterback Brett Favre is 45. Actor Manu Bennett is 45. Actress Joelle Carter is 45. Actress Wendi McLendon-Covey is 45. Actor/TV host Mario Lopez is 41. Race driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. is 40. Actress Jodi Lyn O’Keefe is 36. Singer Mya is 35. Actor Dan Stevens is 32. Singer Cherie is 30. Actress Aimee Teegarden is 25.

Thought for Today: “The opposite of a fact is falsehood, but the opposite of one profound truth may very well be another profound truth.” — Niels Bohr, Danish physicist (1885-1962).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, Sept. 23, the 266th day of 2014. There are 99 days left in the year.

On Sept. 23, 1779, during the Revolutionary War, the American warship Bon Homme Richard, commanded by John Paul Jones, defeated the HMS Serapis in battle off Yorkshire, England; however, the seriously damaged Bon Homme Richard sank two days later.

In 1780, British spy John Andre was captured along with papers revealing Benedict Arnold’s plot to surrender West Point to the British.

In 1806, the Lewis and Clark expedition returned to St. Louis more than two years after setting out for the Pacific Northwest.

In 1846, Neptune was identified as a planet by German astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle (GAH’-luh).

In 1889, American newspaperman and columnist Walter Lippmann was born in New York City. Nintendo was founded in Kyoto, Japan, as a playing card company.

In 1908, an apparent baserunning error by Fred Merkle of the New York Giants cost his team a victory against the Chicago Cubs and left the game tied 1-1. The Cubs won a rematch and with it, the National League pennant.

In 1939, Sigmund Freud (froyd), the founder of psychoanalysis, died in London at age 83.

In 1952, in what became known as the “Checkers” speech, Sen. Richard M. Nixon, R-Calif., salvaged his vice-presidential nomination by appearing live on television to refute allegations of improper campaign fundraising.

In 1957, nine black students who’d entered Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas were forced to withdraw because of a white mob outside.

In 1962, New York’s Philharmonic Hall (later renamed Avery Fisher Hall) formally opened as the first unit of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts. “The Jetsons,” an animated cartoon series about a Space Age family, premiered as the ABC television network’s first program in color.

In 1973, former Argentine president Juan Peron won a landslide election victory that returned him to power; his wife, Isabel, was elected vice president.

In 1981, the Reagan administration announced plans for what became known as Radio Marti.

In 1999, the Mars Climate Orbiter apparently burned up as it attempted to go into orbit around the Red Planet.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush denied painting too rosy a picture about Iraq, and said he would consider sending more troops if asked; Iraq’s interim leader, Ayad Allawi (EE’-yahd ah-LAH’-wee), standing with Bush in the White House Rose Garden, said additional troops weren’t needed.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama addressed the U.N. General Assembly, where he challenged world leaders to shoulder more of the globe’s critical burdens, warning they could no longer castigate the U.S. as a go-it-alone bully while still demanding it cure all ills.

One year ago: Facing possible firing, Lois Lerner, the Internal Revenue Service official at the center of the agency’s tea party scandal, retired. An Egyptian court ordered the banning of the Muslim Brotherhood and the confiscation of its assets. After 20 consecutive years of losing, the Pittsburgh Pirates clinched at least a National League wild card when they beat the Chicago Cubs 2-1 and Washington lost to St. Louis 4-3. (The Pirates’ year came to an end as they lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in a division series that went the full five games.)

Today’s Birthdays: Singer Julio Iglesias is 71. Actor Paul Petersen (TV: “The Donna Reed Show”) is 69. Actress-singer Mary Kay Place is 67. Rock star Bruce Springsteen is 65. Rock musician Leon Taylor (The Ventures) is 59. Actress Rosalind Chao is 57. Golfer Larry Mize is 56. Actor Jason Alexander is 55. Actress Elizabeth Pena is 55. Actor Chi McBride is 53. Country musician Don Herron (BR549) is 52. Actor Erik Todd Dellums is 50. Actress LisaRaye is 48. Singer Ani (AH’-nee) DiFranco is 44. Rock singer Sarah Bettens (K’s Choice) is 42. Recording executive Jermaine Dupri is 42. Actor Kip Pardue is 38. Actor Anthony Mackie is 36. Pop singer Erik-Michael Estrada (TV: “Making the Band”) is 35. Actress Aubrey Dollar is 34. Tennis player Melanie Oudin (oo-DAN’) is 23.

Thought for Today: “Ours is a problem in which deception has become organized and strong; where truth is poisoned at its source; one in which the skill of the shrewdest brains is devoted to misleading a bewildered people.” — Walter Lippmann (1889-1974).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Monday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2014. There are 100 days left in the year. Autumn arrives at 10:29 p.m. Eastern time.

On Sept. 22, 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York.

In 1761, Britain’s King George III and his wife, Charlotte, were crowned in Westminster Abbey.

In 1792, the French Republic was proclaimed.

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of Jan. 1, 1863.

In 1911, pitcher Cy Young, 44, gained his 511th and final career victory as he hurled a 1-0 shutout for the Boston Rustlers against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field.

In 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous “long-count” fight in Chicago.

In 1938, the musical comedy revue “Hellzapoppin’,” starring Ole (OH’-lee) Olsen and Chic Johnson, began a three-year run on Broadway.

In 1949, the Soviet Union exploded its first atomic bomb.

In 1950, Omar N. Bradley was promoted to the rank of five-star general, joining an elite group that included Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, George C. Marshall and Henry H. “Hap” Arnold.

In 1964, the musical “Fiddler on the Roof,” starring Zero Mostel, opened on Broadway, beginning a run of 3,242 performances. The secret agent series “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum, premiered on NBC-TV.

In 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald R. Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. (Moore served 32 years in prison before being paroled on Dec. 31, 2007.)

In 1989, the Irish Republican Army bombed the Royal Marines School of Music in Deal, Kent, England, killing 11 band members. Songwriter Irving Berlin died in New York City at age 101.

In 1994, the situation comedy “Friends” debuted on NBC-TV.

Ten years ago: British hostage Kenneth Bigley, 62, appeared on a video posted on an Islamic Web site weeping and pleading for his life (Bigley was later beheaded by his captors). In Haiti, the death toll from Tropical Storm Jeanne topped 1,000. CBS-owned stations were fined a total of $550,000 by the Federal Communications Commission for Janet Jackson’s exposed right breast during the Super Bowl XXXVIII (38) halftime show (however, a federal appeals court twice threw out the fine, and the U.S. Supreme Court refused to consider reinstating it.) The TV series “Lost” premiered on ABC.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama, visiting New York, brought together Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas for their first face-to-face meeting. Al-Qaida released a 106-minute-long video predicting President Obama’s downfall at the hands of the Muslim world.

One year ago: President Barack Obama spoke at a memorial service for the 12 men and women killed in the Washington Navy Yard shooting, calling on Americans to raise their voices against gun violence. A pair of Sunni militant suicide bombers blew themselves up inside a church in Peshawar, Pakistan, killing 85 Christian worshippers. German Chancellor Angela Merkel led her conservatives to a stunning election victory. “Breaking Bad” won best drama series while “Modern Family” was recognized as best comedy series at the 65th annual Primetime Emmy Awards.

Today’s Birthdays: Baseball Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda is 87. Former NBA Commissioner David Stern is 72. Musician King Sunny Ade (ah-DAY’) is 68. Actor Paul Le Mat is 68. Capt. Mark Phillips is 66. Rock singer David Coverdale (Deep Purple, Whitesnake) is 63. Actress Shari Belafonte is 60. Singer Debby Boone is 58. Country singer June Forester (The Forester Sisters) is 58. Singer Nick Cave is 57. Rock singer Johnette Napolitano is 57. Actress Lynn Herring is 57. Classical crossover singer Andrea Bocelli (an-DRAY’-ah boh-CHEL’-ee) is 56. Singer-musician Joan Jett is 56. Actor Scott Baio is 54. Actress Catherine Oxenberg is 53. Actress Bonnie Hunt is 53. Actor Rob Stone (TV: “Mr. Belvedere”) is 52. Musician Matt Sharp is 45. Rock musician Dave Hernandez is 44. Rhythm-and-blues singer Big Rube (Society of Soul) is 43. Actress Mireille Enos is 39. Actress Daniella Alonso is 36. Actor Michael Graziadei (GRAHT’-zee-uh-day-ee) is 35. Actress Ashley Drane (Eckstein) is 33. Actress Katie Lowes (TV: “Scandal”) is 32. Actor Tom Felton is 27. Actress Juliette Goglia is 19.

Thought for Today: “I saw old Autumn in the misty morn/ Stand shadowless like silence, listening/ To silence.” — Thomas Hood, English author (1799-1845).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Friday, September 19, the 262nd day of 2014. There are 103 days left in the year.

On September 19, 1777, the first Battle of Saratoga was fought during the Revolutionary War; although British forces succeeded in driving out the American troops, the Americans prevailed in a second battle the following month.

In 1796, President George Washington’s farewell address was published.

In 1881, the 20th president of the United States, James A. Garfield, died 2½ months after being shot by Charles Guiteau; Chester Alan Arthur became president.

In 1934, Bruno Hauptmann was arrested in New York and charged with the kidnap-murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr.

In 1945, Nazi radio propagandist William Joyce, known as “Lord Haw-Haw,” was convicted of treason and sentenced to death by a British court.

In 1957, the United States conducted its first contained underground nuclear test, code-named “Rainier,” in the Nevada desert.

In 1959, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, visiting Los Angeles, reacted angrily upon being told that, for security reasons, he wouldn’t get to visit Disneyland.

In 1960, Cuban leader Fidel Castro, in New York to visit the United Nations, angrily checked out of the Shelburne Hotel in a dispute with the management; Castro ended up staying at the Hotel Theresa in Harlem.

In 1964, the family TV show “Flipper,” about a dolphin adopted by a Florida family, premiered on NBC.

In 1970, the situation comedy “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” debuted on CBS-TV.

In 1985, the Mexico City area was struck by a devastating earthquake that killed at least 9,500 people.

In 1989, a Paris-bound DC-10 belonging to French airline UTA was destroyed by a bomb over Niger, killing all 170 people on board. (A French court later convicted six Libyans in absentia for the bombing; Libya agreed in 2004 to pay $170 million in compensation, although it stopped short of acknowledging responsibility.)

In 1994, the medical drama “ER” premiered on NBC-TV.

Ten years ago: Hu Jintao (hoo jin-tow) became the undisputed leader of China with the departure of former President Jiang Zemin (jahng zuh-MEEN’) from his top military post. Militants decapitated three hostages believed to be Iraqi Kurds in a videotape that surfaced hours after Iraq’s prime minister said that January elections would be held on schedule. The United States suffered its biggest Ryder Cup loss in 77 years as it lost to the Europeans, 18 1/2 to 9 1/2. “The Sopranos” won best drama series at the Emmy Awards while “Arrested Development” won best comedy series. Country singer Skeeter Davis, 72, died in Nashville.

Five years ago: Russia said it would scrap a plan to deploy missiles near Poland after Washington dumped a planned missile shield in Eastern Europe. Art Ferrante, 88, half of the piano duo Ferrante and Teicher, died in Longboat Key, Florida. (Lou Teicher had died in 2008 at age 83.)

One year ago: Signaling a dramatic shift in Vatican tone, Pope Francis said in a published interview that the Roman Catholic church had become obsessed by “small-minded rules” about how to be faithful and that pastors should instead emphasize compassion over condemnation when discussing divisive social issues such as abortion, gays and contraception. A Texas appeals court tossed the criminal conviction of former U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, saying there was insufficient evidence for a jury in 2010 to have found him guilty of illegally funneling money to Republican candidates. Hiroshi Yamauchi, 85, who ran Nintendo for more than 50 years, died in central Japan.

Today’s Birthdays: Author Roger Angell is 94. Host James Lipton (TV: “Inside the Actors Studio”) is 88. Actress Rosemary Harris is 87. Former Defense Secretary Harold Brown is 87. Actor Adam West is 86. Actor David McCallum (TV: “NCIS”) is 81. Singer-songwriter Paul Williams is 74. Singer Bill Medley is 74. Singer Sylvia Tyson (Ian and Sylvia) is 74. R&B singer Freda Payne is 72. Golfer Jane Blalock is 69. Singer David Bromberg is 69. Actor Randolph Mantooth is 69. Rock singer-musician Lol Creme (10cc) is 67. Former NFL running back Larry Brown is 67. Actor Jeremy Irons is 66. Actress Twiggy Lawson is 65. TV personality Joan Lunden is 64. Singer-producer Daniel Lanois (lan-WAH’) is 63. Actor Scott Colomby is 62. Musician-producer Nile Rodgers is 62. College Football Hall of Famer and former NFL player Reggie Williams is 60. Singer-actor Rex Smith is 59. Actor Kevin Hooks is 56. Actress Carolyn McCormick is 55. Celebrity chef Mario Batali is 54. Country singer Jeff Bates is 51. Country singer Trisha Yearwood is 50. Actress-comedian Cheri Oteri is 49. News anchor Soledad O’Brien is 48. Rhythm-and-blues singer Espraronza Griffin (Society of Soul) is 45. Celebrity chef Michael Symon is 45. Actress Sanaa Lathan (suh-NAH’ LAY’-thun) is 43. Actress Stephanie J. Block is 42. Rock singer A. Jay Popoff (Lit) is 41. “Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon is 40. TV personality Carter Oosterhouse is 38. Actress-TV host Alison Sweeney is 38. Rock musician Ryan Dusick is 37. Folk-rock singers-musicians Tegan (TEE’-gan) and Sara Quin are 34. Actor Columbus Short is 32. Rapper Eamon is 31. Christian rock musician JD Frazier is 31. Actor Kevin Zegers is 30. Actress Danielle Panabaker is 27.

Thought for Today: “He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god; he is no part of a state.” — Aristotle, Greek philosopher (384 B.C.-322 B.C.).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Saturday, September 13, the 256th day of 2014. There are 109 days left in the year.

On September 13, 1814, during the War of 1812, British naval forces began bombarding Fort McHenry in Baltimore but were driven back by American defenders in a battle that lasted until the following morning.

In 1759, during the final French and Indian War, the British defeated the French on the Plains of Abraham overlooking Quebec City.

In 1788, the Congress of the Confederation authorized the first national election, and declared New York City the temporary national capital.

In 1803, Commodore John Barry, considered by many the father of the American Navy, died in Philadelphia.

In 1911, the song “Oh, You Beautiful Doll,” a romantic rag by Nat D. Ayer and Seymour Brown, was first published by Jerome H. Remick & Co.

In 1948, Republican Margaret Chase Smith of Maine was elected to the U.S. Senate; she became the first woman to serve in both houses of Congress.

In 1959, Elvis Presley first met his future wife, 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu, while stationed in West Germany with the U.S. Army. (They married in 1967, but divorced in 1973.)

In 1971, a four-day inmates’ rebellion at the Attica Correctional Facility in western New York ended as police and guards stormed the prison; the ordeal and final assault claimed the lives of 32 inmates and 11 employees.

In 1974, “Chico and the Man,” starring Jack Albertson and Freddie Prinze, “The Rockford Files,” starring James Garner, and “Police Woman,” starring Angie Dickinson, premiered on NBC-TV.

In 1989, Fay Vincent was elected commissioner of Major League Baseball, succeeding the late A. Bartlett Giamatti (juh-MAH’-tee).

In 1993, at the White House, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO chairman Yasser Arafat shook hands after signing an accord granting limited Palestinian autonomy. “Late Night with Conan O’Brien” premiered on NBC.

In 1996, rapper Tupac Shakur died at a Las Vegas hospital six days after he was wounded in a drive-by shooting; he was 25.

In 1998, former Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace died in Montgomery at age 79.

Ten years ago: U.S. warplanes in Iraq unleashed devastating airstrikes on a suspected hideout for operatives from an al-Qaida-linked group the same day a video posted on a website in the name of the militants purportedly showed the beheading of a kidnapped Turkish truck driver. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer agreed to a nearly $3 billion acquisition by a Sony-led consortium. Oakland posted a 7-6, 10-inning win over the Rangers in a game that was delayed in the ninth inning after Texas reliever Frank Francisco hurled a chair and injured two fans at the Coliseum; Francisco ended up pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault and was sentenced to 20 days in a work program. The wine-tasting comedy-drama “Sideways” premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Five years ago: The body of missing Yale University graduate student Annie Le (lay) was found behind a research lab wall on what would have been her wedding day. (A lab technician, Raymond Clark III, was later sentenced to 44 years in prison for murdering Le.) Kim Clijsters, capping a comeback from two years out of tennis, became the first unseeded woman to win the U.S. Open as she defeated No. 9 Caroline Wozniacki, 7-5, 6-3. At the MTV Video Music Awards, Taylor Swift’s acceptance speech for best female video for “You Belong with Me” was disrupted by Kanye West, who took the microphone to praise Beyonce’s video of “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It).”

One year ago: By truck and helicopter, thousands of people stranded by floodwaters were brought down from the Colorado Rockies. A pre-dawn fire swept through a Russian psychiatric hospital, killing 37 people.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Barbara Bain is 83. Actress Eileen Fulton (TV: “As the World Turns”) is 81. TV producer Fred Silverman is 77. Rock singer David Clayton-Thomas (Blood, Sweat & Tears) is 73. Actress Jacqueline Bisset is 70. Singer Peter Cetera is 70. Actress Christine Estabrook is 64. Actress Jean Smart is 63. Singer Randy Jones (The Village People) is 62. Record producer Don Was is 62. Actor Isiah Whitlock Jr. is 60. Actress-comedian Geri Jewell is 58. Country singer Bobbie Cryner is 53. Rock singer-musician Dave Mustaine (Megadeth) is 53. Radio-TV personality Tavis Smiley is 50. Rock musician Zak Starkey is 49. Actor Louis Mandylor is 48. Olympic gold medal runner Michael Johnson is 47. Rock musician Steve Perkins is 47. Actor Roger Howarth is 46. Actor Dominic Fumusa is 45. Actress Louise Lombard is 44. Tennis player Goran Ivanisevic (ee-van-EE’-seh-vihch) is 43. Country singer Aaron Benward (Blue County) is 41. Country musician Joe Don Rooney (Rascal Flatts) is 39. Actor Scott Vickaryous is 39. Singer Fiona Apple is 37. Contemporary Christian musician Hector Cervantes (Casting Crowns) is 34. MLB pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka is 34. Actor Ben Savage is 34. Rock singer Niall Horan (One Direction) is 21. Actor Mitch Holleman (“Reba”) is 19.

Thought for Today: “Revolt and terror pay a price. Order and law have a cost.” — Carl Sandburg, American poet and author (1878-1967).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Friday, September 12, the 255th day of 2014. There are 110 days left in the year.

On September 12, 1914, during World War I, the First Battle of the Marne ended in an Allied victory against Germany.

In 1814, the Battle of North Point took place in Maryland during the War of 1812 as American forces slowed British troops advancing on Baltimore.

In 1846, Elizabeth Barrett secretly married Robert Browning at St. Marylebone Church in London.

In 1938, Adolf Hitler demanded the right of self-determination for the Sudeten (soo-DAYT’-un) Germans in Czechoslovakia.

In 1944, the Second Quebec Conference opened with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill in attendance.

In 1953, Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kennedy married Jacqueline Lee Bouvier (boo-vee-AY’) in Newport, Rhode Island.

In 1954, the TV show “Lassie” made its debut on CBS.

In 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy addressed questions about his Roman Catholic faith, telling a Southern Baptist group, “I do not speak for my church on public matters, and the church does not speak for me.”

In 1962, in a speech at Rice University in Houston, President John F. Kennedy reaffirmed his support for the manned space program, declaring: “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.”

In 1974, Emperor Haile Selassie (HY’-lee sehl-AH’-see) was deposed by Ethiopia’s military after ruling for 58 years.

In 1977, South African black student leader Steve Biko (BEE’-koh) died while in police custody, triggering an international outcry.

In 1986, Joseph Cicippio (sih-SIHP’-ee-oh), the acting comptroller at the American University in Beirut, was kidnapped (he was released in December 1991).

In 1994, a stolen, single-engine Cessna crashed into the South Lawn of the White House, coming to rest against the executive mansion; the pilot, Frank Corder, was killed.

Ten years ago: US Airways Group Inc. filed for bankruptcy protection for the second time in two years. (The following year, US Airways emerged from bankruptcy protection, clearing the way for a merger with America West Holdings Group.) Ten people were killed in an apartment fire just outside Columbus, Ohio. Hurricane Ivan battered the Cayman Islands with ferocious 150-mph winds. Roger Federer won the U.S. Open, defeating Lleyton Hewitt 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-0. Playwright Jerome Chodorov died in Nyack, New York, at age 93.

Five years ago: Tens of thousands of protesters marched to the U.S. Capitol, showing their disdain for President Barack Obama’s health care plan. The president, keeping up the drumbeat for his proposal, told a packed rally in Minneapolis, “I will not accept the status quo. Not this time. Not now.” Serena Williams’ U.S. Open title defense ended with a bizarre loss to Kim Clijsters (KLY’-sturz) after Williams went into a tirade against a line judge who’d called her for a foot fault; following her outburst, Williams was penalized a point for unsportsmanlike conduct, ending the match, 6-4, 7-5. Norman Borlaug, 95, the father of the “green revolution” who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in combating world hunger, died in Dallas.

One year ago: Omar Hammami, an American who became one of Somalia’s most visible Islamic rebels, was killed by rivals in the al-Qaida-linked extremist group al-Shabab. The U.S. space agency NASA announced that Voyager 1, launched 36 years earlier, had crossed a new frontier, becoming the first man-made spacecraft ever to leave the solar system. American inventor Ray Dolby, 80, founder of Dolby Laboratories, died in San Francisco.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor Dickie Moore (“Our Gang”) is 89. Actor Freddie Jones is 87. Actor Ian Holm is 83. U.S. Rep. Henry Waxman, D-Calif., is 75. Actress Linda Gray is 74. Singer Maria Muldaur is 72. Actor Joe Pantoliano is 63. Singer-musician Gerry Beckley (America) is 62. Original MTV VJ Nina Blackwood is 62. Rock musician Neil Peart (Rush) is 62. Actor Peter Scolari is 59. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback is 58. Actress Rachel Ward is 57. Actress Amy Yasbeck is 52. Rock musician Norwood Fisher (Fishbone) is 49. Actor Darren E. Burrows is 48. Rock singer-musician Ben Folds (Ben Folds Five) is 48. Actor-comedian Louis (loo-ee) C.K. is 47. Rock musician Larry LaLonde (Primus) is 46. Golfer Angel Cabrera is 45. Actor-singer Will Chase (TV: “Nashville”) is 44. Actor Josh Hopkins is 44. Country singer Jennifer Nettles is 40. Rapper 2 Chainz is 37. Actor Ben McKenzie is 36. Singer Ruben Studdard is 36. Basketball player Yao Ming is 34. Singer-actress Jennifer Hudson is 33. Actress Emmy Rossum is 28. Actor Colin Ford is 18.

Thought for Today: “We must be willing to pay a price for freedom, for no price that is ever asked for it is half the cost of doing without it.” — H.L. Mencken, American author and journalist (1880-1956).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, September 10, the 253rd day of 2014. There are 112 days left in the year.

On September 10, 1939, Canada declared war on Germany.

In 1608, John Smith was elected president of the Jamestown colony council in Virginia.

In 1813, an American naval force commanded by Oliver H. Perry defeated the British in the Battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812. (Afterward, Perry sent out the message, “We have met the enemy and they are ours.”)

In 1914, movie director Robert Wise (“West Side Story”; “The Sound of Music”) was born in Winchester, Indiana.

In 1919, New York City welcomed home Gen. John J. Pershing and 25,000 soldiers who’d served in the U.S. First Division during World War I.

In 1935, Sen. Huey P. Long died in Baton Rouge two days after being shot in the Louisiana state Capitol, allegedly by Dr. Carl Weiss.

In 1945, Vidkun Quisling was sentenced to death in Norway for collaborating with the Nazis (he was executed by firing squad in October 1945).

In 1955, the long-running TV Western series “Gunsmoke,” starring James Arness as Marshal Matt Dillon, premiered on CBS television.

In 1963, 20 black students entered Alabama public schools following a standoff between federal authorities and Gov. George C. Wallace.

In 1974, the West African country of Guinea-Bissau became fully independent of Portugal.

In 1979, four Puerto Rican nationalists imprisoned for a 1954 attack on the U.S. House of Representatives and a 1950 attempt on the life of President Harry S. Truman were freed from prison after being granted clemency by President Jimmy Carter.

In 1984, a revival of the TV game show “Jeopardy!” hosted by Alex Trebek premiered in syndication.

In 1994, the prison drama “The Shawshank Redemption,” starring Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Ten years ago: CBS News vigorously defended its report about President George W. Bush’s Air National Guard service, with anchor Dan Rather saying broadcast memos questioned by forensic experts came from “what we consider to be solid sources.” Former transportation secretary Brock Adams died in Stevensville, Maryland, at age 77.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama said he’d accepted Republican Rep. Joe Wilson’s apology for shouting “You lie!” during the president’s health-care speech to Congress. A frail Sen. Robert Byrd addressed the Senate for the first time in months to pay tribute to the late Sen. Edward Kennedy, his one-time rival and longtime dear friend. The activist group ACORN fired two employees of its Baltimore office after they were seen in hidden-camera video giving tax advice to a pair of conservative activists, James O’Keefe and Hannah Giles, who were posing as a pimp and a prostitute.

One year ago: President Barack Obama, in a nationally broadcast address, said diplomacy held “the potential to remove the threat of chemical weapons” in Syria without the use of force, but declared the U.S. military would be “ready to respond” against President Bashar Assad if other measures failed. An Indian court convicted four men in the fatal gang rape of a young woman on a moving New Delhi bus. (The four were later sentenced to death.) Thomas Bach was elected president of the International Olympic Committee, succeeding Jacques Rogge (zhahk ROH’-geh).

Today’s Birthdays: World Golf Hall of Famer Arnold Palmer is 85. Actor Philip Baker Hall is 83. Actor Greg Mullavey is 81. Country singer Tommy Overstreet is 77. Jazz vibraphonist Roy Ayers is 74. Singer Danny Hutton (Three Dog Night) is 72. Singer Jose Feliciano is 69. Actor Tom Ligon is 69. Actress Judy Geeson is 66. Former Canadian first lady Margaret Trudeau is 66. Political commentator Bill O’Reilly is 65. Rock musician Joe Perry (Aerosmith) is 64. Actress Amy Irving is 61. Country singer Rosie Flores is 58. Actress Kate Burton is 57. Movie director Chris Columbus is 56. Actor Colin Firth is 54. Rock singer-musician David Lowery (Cracker) is 54. Actor Sean O’Bryan is 51. Actor Raymond Cruz is 50. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher Randy Johnson is 51. Rock musician Robin Goodridge (Bush) is 49. Rock musician Stevie D. (Buckcherry) is 48. Rock singer-musician Miles Zuniga (Fastball) is 48. Actress Nina Repeta (NY’-nuh ruh-PEHT’-ah) is 47. Rapper Big Daddy Kane is 46. Movie director Guy Ritchie is 46. Contemporary Christian singer Sara Groves is 42. Actor Ryan Phillippe (FIHL’-ih-pee) is 40. Actor Kyle Bornheimer is 39. Rock musician Mikey Way (My Chemical Romance) is 34. Olympic bronze medal figure skater Timothy Goebel is 34. Rock musician Matthew Followill (Kings of Leon) is 30. Singer Ashley Monroe (Pistol Annies) is 28. Singer Sanjaya Malakar (“American Idol”) is 25. Actor Chandler Massie is 24. Actress Hannah Hodson is 23.

Thought for Today: “There are years that ask questions and years that answer.” — Zora Neale Hurston, American author (1891-1960).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, August 27, the 239th day of 2014. There are 126 days left in the year.

On August 27, 1964, President Lyndon Baines Johnson accepted his party’s nomination for a term in his own right, telling the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, “Let us join together in giving every American the fullest life which he can hope for.” The Walt Disney movie musical fantasy “Mary Poppins,” starring Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke, premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood. Comedian Gracie Allen, the wife of George Burns, died in Los Angeles.

In 1776, the Battle of Long Island began during the Revolutionary War as British troops attacked American forces, who ended up being forced to retreat two days later.

In 1883, the island volcano Krakatoa erupted with a series of cataclysmic explosions; the resulting tidal waves in Indonesia’s Sunda Strait claimed some 36,000 lives in Java and Sumatra.

In 1908, Lyndon Baines Johnson, the 36th president of the United States, was born near Stonewall, Texas.

In 1928, the Kellogg-Briand Pact was signed in Paris, outlawing war and providing for the peaceful settlement of disputes.

In 1939, the first turbojet-powered aircraft, the Heinkel He 178, went on its first full-fledged test flight over Germany.

In 1949, a violent white mob prevented an outdoor concert headlined by Paul Robeson from taking place near Peekskill, New York. (The concert was held eight days later.)

In 1957, the USS Swordfish, the second Skate Class nuclear submarine, was launched from the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Maine.

In 1962, the United States launched the Mariner 2 space probe, which flew past Venus in December 1962.

In 1967, Brian Epstein, manager of The Beatles, was found dead in his London flat from an overdose of sleeping pills; he was 32.

In 1979, British war hero Lord Louis Mountbatten and three other people, including his 14-year-old grandson Nicholas, were killed off the coast of Ireland in a boat explosion claimed by the Irish Republican Army.

In 1989, the first U.S. commercial satellite rocket was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida — a Delta booster carrying a British communications satellite, the Marcopolo 1.

In 2008, Barack Obama was nominated for president by the Democratic National Convention in Denver.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed executive orders designed to strengthen the CIA director’s power over the nation’s intelligence agencies and create a national counterterrorism center. Three students were killed in a fire at a University of Mississippi fraternity house.

Five years ago: Mourners filed past the closed casket of the late Sen. Edward Kennedy at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston. Jaycee Lee Dugard, kidnapped when she was 11, was reunited with her mother 18 years after her abduction in South Lake Tahoe, California. Alex Grass, 82, founder of the Rite Aid drugstore chain, died in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

One year ago: Maj. Nidal Hasan, the Army psychiatrist who’d fatally shot 13 people at Fort Hood, Texas, in 2009, rested his case without presenting any evidence during his trial’s penalty phase. (Hasan ended up being sentenced to death.)

Today’s Birthdays: Author Dame Antonia Fraser is 82. Actor Tommy Sands is 77. Bluegrass singer-musician J.D. Crowe is 77. Musician Daryl Dragon is 72. Actress Tuesday Weld is 71. Actor G.W. Bailey is 70. Rock singer-musician Tim Bogert is 70. Actress Marianne Sagebrecht is 69. Country musician Jeff Cook is 65. Actor Paul Reubens is 62. Rock musician Alex Lifeson (Rush) is 61. Actor Peter Stormare is 61. Actress Diana Scarwid is 59. Rock musician Glen Matlock (The Sex Pistols) is 58. Golfer Bernhard Langer is 57. Country singer Jeffrey Steele is 53. Gospel singer Yolanda Adams is 53. Country musician Matthew Basford (Yankee Grey) is 52. Writer-producer Dean Devlin is 52. Rock musician Mike Johnson is 49. Rap musician Bobo (Cypress Hill) is 46. Country singer Colt Ford is 45. Actress Chandra Wilson is 45. Rock musician Tony Kanal (No Doubt) is 44. Actress Sarah Chalke is 38. Actor RonReaco (correct) Lee is 38. Rapper Mase is 37. Actress-singer Demetria McKinney is 36. Actor Aaron Paul is 35. Rock musician Jon Siebels (Eve 6) is 35. Actor Shaun Weiss is 35. Contemporary Christian musician Megan Garrett (Casting Crowns) is 34. Actor Kyle Lowder is 34. Actor Patrick J. Adams is 33. Singer Mario is 28. Actress Alexa Vega is 26. Actress Savannah Paige Rae (TV: “Parenthood”) is 11.

Thought for Today: “Reality can destroy the dream; why shouldn’t the dream destroy reality?” — G.E. Moore, British philosopher (1873-1958).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Sunday, August 24, the 236th day of 2014. There are 129 days left in the year.

On Aug. 24, 1814, during the War of 1812, British forces invaded Washington D.C., setting fire to the Capitol (which was still under construction) and the White House, as well as other public buildings.

In A.D. 79, long-dormant Mount Vesuvius erupted, burying the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum in volcanic ash; an estimated 20,000 people died.
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In 1572, the St. Bartholomew’s Day massacre of French Protestants at the hands of Catholics began in Paris.

In 1821, the Treaty of Cordoba was signed, granting independence to Mexico from Spanish rule.

In 1912, Congress passed a measure creating the Alaska Territory. Congress approved legislation establishing Parcel Post delivery by the U.S. Post Office Department, slated to begin on January 1, 1913.

In 1932, Amelia Earhart embarked on a 19-hour flight from Los Angeles to Newark, New Jersey, making her the first woman to fly solo, non-stop, from coast to coast.

In 1949, the North Atlantic Treaty came into force.

In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Communist Control Act, outlawing the Communist Party in the United States.

In 1964, the first Roman Catholic Mass celebrated in English took place at Kiel Auditorium in St. Louis.

In 1970, an explosives-laden van left by anti-war extremists blew up outside the University of Wisconsin’s Sterling Hall in Madison, killing 33-year-old researcher Robert Fassnacht.

In 1989, Baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti (juh-MAH’-tee) banned Pete Rose from the game for betting on his own team, the Cincinnati Reds.

In 1992, Hurricane Andrew smashed into Florida, causing $30 billion in damage; 43 U.S. deaths were blamed on the storm.

In 2006, the International Astronomical Union declared that Pluto was no longer a planet, demoting it to the status of a “dwarf planet.”

Ten years ago: An independent commission said the blame for abuses at Iraq’s Abu Ghraib prison lay mainly with the American soldiers who ran the jail, but said senior commanders and top-level Pentagon officials could also be faulted for failed leadership and oversight. Chechen separatists set off bombs aboard two Russian airliners that crashed after taking off from the same Moscow airport, killing 90 people. Psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, who famously theorized that terminally ill patients go through five stages of grief, died in Scottsdale, Arizona, at age 78.

Five years ago: All sales under the government’s Cash for Clunkers program came to an end, although car dealers were given more time to submit pending claims for reimbursement. Scotland’s justice minister, Kenny MacAskill, defended his much-criticized decision to free Abdel Baset al-Megrahi (AHB’-dehl BAH’-seht AH’-lee ahl-meh-GRAH’-hee), convicted of being the Lockerbie bomber, on compassionate grounds.

One year ago: Tens of thousands of people marched to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and down the National Mall, commemorating the 50th anniversary of King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech (delivered on August 28, 1963). Julie Harris, 87, one of Broadway’s most honored performers, died in West Chatham, Massachusetts.

Today’s Birthdays: Former Education Secretary Shirley Hufstedler is 89. Actor Kenny Baker (“Star Wars”) is 80. Composer-musician Mason Williams is 76. Rhythm-and-blues singer Marshall Thompson (The Chi-Lites) is 72. Rock musician Ken Hensley is 69. Actress Anne Archer is 67. Actor Joe Regalbuto is 65. Actor Kevin Dunn is 59. Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee is 59. Actor-writer Stephen Fry is 57. Actor Steve Guttenberg is 56. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Cal Ripken Jr. is 54. Actor Jared Harris is 53. Talk show host Craig Kilborn is 52. CBS News correspondent Major Garrett is 52. Rock singer John Bush is 51. Actress Marlee Matlin is 49. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Reggie Miller is 49. Broadcast journalist David Gregory (“Meet the Press”) is 44. Country singer Kristyn Osborn (SHeDaisy) is 44. Actor-comedian Dave Chappelle is 41. Actor Carmine Giovinazzo is 41. Actor Alex O’Loughlin is 38. Actress Beth Riesgraf is 36. Actor Chad Michael Murray is 33. Christian rock musician Jeffrey Gilbert (Kutless) is 31. Singer Mika is 31. Actor Blake Berris (TV: “Days of Our Lives”) is 30. Actor Rupert Grint (“Harry Potter” films) is 26.

Thought for Today: “Of the twenty or so civilizations known to modern Western historians, all except our own appear to be dead or moribund, and, when we diagnose each case… we invariably find that the cause of death has been either War or Class or some combination of the two.” — Arnold J. Toynbee, English historian (1889-1975).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Saturday, August 23, the 235th day of 2014. There are 130 days left in the year.

On August 23, 1914, Japan declared war against Germany in World War I.

In 1305, Scottish rebel leader Sir William Wallace was executed by the English for treason.

In 1775, Britain’s King George III proclaimed the American colonies to be in a state of “open and avowed rebellion.”

In 1858, “Ten Nights in a Bar-room,” a play by Timothy Shay Arthur about the perils of drinking alcohol, opened in New York.

In 1913, Copenhagen’s Little Mermaid statue, inspired by the Hans Christian Andersen story, was unveiled in the harbor of the Danish capital.

In 1926, silent film star Rudolph Valentino died in New York at age 31.

In 1927, amid protests, Italian-born anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were executed in Boston for the murders of two men during a 1920 robbery.

In 1939, Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union agreed to a non-aggression treaty, the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in Moscow.

In 1944, Romanian Prime Minister Ion Antonescu was dismissed by King Michael, paving the way for Romania to abandon the Axis in favor of the Allies.

In 1960, Broadway librettist Oscar Hammerstein (HAM’-ur-STYN’) II, 65, died in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

In 1973, a bank robbery-turned-hostage-taking began in Stockholm, Sweden; the four hostages ended up empathizing with their captors, a psychological condition now referred to as “Stockholm Syndrome.”

In 1982, Lebanon’s parliament elected Christian militia leader Bashir Gemayel president. (However, Gemayel was assassinated some three weeks later.)

In 1989, in a case that inflamed racial tensions in New York, Yusuf Hawkins, a 16-year-old black youth, was shot dead after he and his friends were confronted by a group of white youths in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn. (Gunman Joey Fama was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison; he will be eligible for parole in 2022.)

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush criticized a political commercial accusing Democratic nominee John Kerry of inflating his own Vietnam War record, and said broadcast attacks by outside groups had no place in the race for the White House. In Athens, Jeremy Wariner became the sixth consecutive American to win the Olympic title in the 400 meters, leading a U.S. sweep of the medals. The U.S. softball team won its third straight gold medal with a 5-1 victory over Australia.

Five years ago: Reality TV contestant Ryan Jenkins, suspected of killing his wife, former model Jasmine Fiore, was found hanging in a motel in Hope, British Columbia, Canada, an apparent suicide. Eric Bruntlett turned an unassisted triple play to finish Philadelphia’s wild 9-7 victory over the New York Mets. Stefania Fernandez, Miss Venezuela, won the 2009 Miss Universe pageant in the Bahamas; she succeeded fellow Venezuelan Dayana Mendoza, the previous year’s winner.

One year ago: A military jury convicted Maj. Nidal Hasan in the deadly 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, that claimed 13 lives; the Army psychiatrist was later sentenced to death. Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, the U.S. soldier who’d massacred 16 Afghan civilians, was sentenced at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, to life in prison with no chance of parole. San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, a Democrat, agreed to resign in return for the city’s help defending him against claims he’d groped, kissed and made lewd comments to women. (Filner later pleaded guilty to a felony for manhandling a woman at a fundraising event and two misdemeanor battery charges; he served three months of house arrest.)

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Vera Miles is 84. Actress Barbara Eden is 83. Political satirist Mark Russell is 82. Pro Football Hall of Famer Sonny Jurgensen is 80. Actor Richard Sanders is 74. Ballet dancer Patricia McBride is 72. Former Surgeon General Antonia Novello is 70. Pro Football Hall of Famer Rayfield Wright is 69. Country singer Rex Allen Jr. is 67. Singer Linda Thompson is 67. Actress Shelley Long is 65. Actor-singer Rick Springfield is 65. Country singer-musician Woody Paul (Riders in the Sky) is 65. Queen Noor of Jordan is 63. Actor-producer Mark Hudson is 63. Actor Skipp Sudduth is 58. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher Mike Boddicker is 57. Rock musician Dean DeLeo (Army of Anyone; Stone Temple Pilots) is 53. Tejano singer Emilio Navaira (nah-VY’-rah) is 52. Country musician Ira Dean (Trick Pony) is 45. Actor Jay Mohr is 44. Actor Ray Park is 40. Actor Scott Caan is 38. Country singer Shelly Fairchild is 37. Figure skater Nicole Bobek is 37. Rock singer Julian Casablancas (The Strokes) is 36. NBA player Kobe Bryant is 36. Actress Joanne Froggatt is 34. Actress Annie Ilonzeh is 31. Dance musician Sky Blu is 28. Actress Kimberly Matula is 26. NBA player Jeremy Lin is 26.

Thought for Today: “I know the world is filled with troubles and many injustices. But reality is as beautiful as it is ugly. I think it is just as important to sing about beautiful mornings as it is to talk about slums. I just couldn’t write anything without hope in it.” — Oscar Hammerstein II (1895-1960).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Friday, August 15, the 227th day of 2014. There are 138 days left in the year.

On August 15, 1914, the Panama Canal officially opened as the SS Ancon crossed the just-completed waterway between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans.

In 1057, Macbeth, King of Scots, was killed in battle by Malcolm, the eldest son of King Duncan, whom Macbeth had slain.

In 1483, the Sistine Chapel was consecrated by Pope Sixtus IV.

In 1812, the Battle of Fort Dearborn took place as Potawatomi warriors attacked a U.S. military garrison of about 100 people. (Most of the garrison was killed, while the remainder were taken prisoner.)

In 1935, humorist Will Rogers and aviator Wiley Post were killed when their airplane crashed near Point Barrow in the Alaska Territory.

In 1939, the MGM musical “The Wizard of Oz” opened at the Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood.

In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces landed in southern France in Operation Dragoon.

In 1945, in a radio address, Japan’s Emperor Hirohito announced that his country had accepted terms of surrender for ending World War II.

In 1947, India became independent after some 200 years of British rule.

In 1967, a 50-foot-tall sculpture by Pablo Picasso was dedicated in Daley Plaza in Chicago by Mayor Richard J. Daley.

In 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair opened in upstate New York.

In 1974, a gunman attempted to shoot South Korean President Park Chung-hee during a speech; although Park was unhurt, his wife, Yuk Young-soo, was struck and killed, along with a teenage girl. (The gunman was later executed.)

In 1989, F.W. de Klerk was sworn in as acting president of South Africa, one day after P.W. Botha resigned as the result of a power struggle within the National Party.

Ten years ago: Residents left homeless by Hurricane Charley dug through their ravaged homes, rescuing what they could as President George W. Bush promised rapid delivery of disaster aid. In Athens, the U.S. men’s basketball team lost 92-73 to Puerto Rico, only the third Olympic defeat ever for the Americans and the first since adding pros. Vijay Singh won the PGA Championship in Haven, Wisconsin.

Five years ago: U.S. Sen. Jim Webb, D-Va., visiting Myanmar, was able to secure the release of John Yettaw, an American imprisoned for swimming to the home of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi (ahng sahn soo chee). A wedding tent fire in Kuwait claimed the lives of 55 women and children. Virginia Davis, 90, who’d appeared in Walt Disney’s pioneering “Alice” films in the 1920s, died in Corona, California.

One year ago: President Barack Obama scrapped plans for joint military exercises with Egypt, where spiraling violence in and around Cairo were claiming hundreds of lives. A powerful car bomb ripped through a crowded southern Beirut stronghold of Hezbollah, killing at least 27 people. Bert Lance, President Jimmy Carter’s first budget director, died in Georgia at age 82.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Rose Marie is 91. Political activist Phyllis Schlafly is 90. Actor Mike Connors is 89. Actress Lori Nelson is 81. Civil rights activist Vernon Jordan is 79. Actor Jim Dale is 79. Actress Pat Priest is 78. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer is 76. U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., is 76. Musician Pete York (Spencer Davis Group) is 72. Author-journalist Linda Ellerbee is 70. Songwriter Jimmy Webb is 68. Rock singer-musician Tom Johnston (The Doobie Brothers) is 66. Actress Phyllis Smith is 65. Britain’s Princess Anne is 64. Actress Tess Harper is 64. Actor Larry Mathews is 59. Actor Zeljko Ivanek (ZEHL’-koh eh-VON’-ehk) is 57. Actor-comedian Rondell Sheridan is 56. Rock singer-musician Matt Johnson (The The) is 53. Movie director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (ihn-YAH’-ee-tu) is 51. Philanthropist Melinda Gates is 50. Country singer Angela Rae (Wild Horses) is 48. Actor Peter Hermann is 47. Actress Debra Messing is 46. Actor Anthony Anderson is 44. Actor Ben Affleck is 42. Singer Mikey Graham (Boyzone) is 42. Actress Natasha Henstridge is 40. Actress Nicole Paggi is 37. Figure skater Jennifer Kirk is 30. Latin pop singer Belinda (cq) is 25. Rock singer Joe Jonas (The Jonas Brothers) is 25. Actor-singer Carlos Pena is 25. Actress Jennifer Lawrence is 24. Rap DJ Smoove da General (Cali Swag District) is 24.

Thought for Today: “Forgiveness is the key to action and freedom.” — Hannah Arendt, American author and philosopher (1906-1975).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Thursday, August 14, the 226th day of 2014. There are 139 days left in the year.

On August 14, 1944, the federal government allowed the manufacture of certain domestic appliances, such as electric ranges and vacuum cleaners, to resume on a limited basis.

In 1848, the Oregon Territory was created.

In 1900, international forces, including U.S. Marines, entered Beijing to put down the Boxer Rebellion, which was aimed at purging China of foreign influence.

In 1909, the newly opened Indianapolis Motor Speedway held its first event, a series of motorcycle races.

In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law.

In 1945, President Harry S. Truman announced that Japan had surrendered unconditionally, ending World War II.

In 1947, Pakistan became independent of British rule.

In 1951, newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, 88, died in Beverly Hills, California.

In 1969, British troops went to Northern Ireland to intervene in sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics.

In 1973, U.S. bombing of Cambodia came to a halt.

In 1980, workers went on strike at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk (guh-DANSK’), Poland, in a job action that resulted in creation of the Solidarity labor movement. Actress-model Dorothy Stratten, 20, was shot to death by her estranged husband and manager, Paul Snider, who then killed himself.

In 1989, South African President P.W. Botha announced his resignation after losing a bitter power struggle within his National Party.

In 1994, Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, the terrorist known as “Carlos the Jackal,” was captured by French agents in Sudan.

Ten years ago: A visibly weak Pope John Paul II joined thousands of other ailing pilgrims at a cliffside shrine in Lourdes, France, telling them he shared in their physical suffering and assuring them the burden was part of God’s “wondrous plan.” Nobel Prize-winning poet Czeslaw Milosz died in Krakow, Poland, at age 93. Fifteen-term congressman William D. Ford died in Ypsilanti Township, Michigan, at age 77.

Five years ago: Kicking off a four-state push for his health care overhaul plan, President Barack Obama denounced what he suggested was news media overemphasis on scenes of angry protesters at town-hall meetings, telling his own gathering in Belgrade, Montana, that “TV loves a ruckus.” Charles Manson follower Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, 60, convicted of trying to assassinate President Gerald Ford in 1975, was released from a Texas prison hospital after more than three decades behind bars.

One year ago: Israeli and Palestinian negotiators kicked off their first substantive round of peace talks in nearly five years, meeting at an undisclosed location in Jerusalem. Riot police swept away two encampments of supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi in Cairo, sparking running street battles. Former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in prison for illegally spending $750,000 in campaign funds on personal items.

Today’s Birthdays: Broadway lyricist Lee Adams (“Bye Bye Birdie”) is 90. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Russell Baker is 89. Singer Buddy Greco is 88. College Football Hall of Famer John Brodie is 79. Singer Dash Crofts is 76. Rock singer David Crosby is 73. Country singer Connie Smith is 73. Comedian-actor Steve Martin is 69. Actor Antonio Fargas is 68. Singer-musician Larry Graham is 68. Actress Susan Saint James is 68. Actor David Schramm is 68. Author Danielle Steel is 67. Rock singer-musician Terry Adams (NRBQ) is 64. “Far Side” cartoonist Gary Larson is 64. Actor Carl Lumbly is 63. Olympic gold medal swimmer Debbie Meyer is 62. Film composer James Horner is 61. Actress Jackee Harry is 58. Actress Marcia Gay Harden is 55. Basketball Hall of Famer Earvin “Magic” Johnson is 55. Singer Sarah Brightman is 54. Actress Susan Olsen is 53. Actress-turned-fashion/interior designer Cristi Conaway is 50. Rock musician Keith Howland (Chicago) is 50. Actress Halle Berry is 48. Actress Catherine Bell is 46. Country musician Cody McCarver (Confederate Railroad) is 46. Rock musician Kevin Cadogan is 44. Actor Scott Michael Campbell is 43. Actress Lalanya Masters is 42. Actor Christopher Gorham is 40. Actress Mila Kunis is 31. TV personality Spencer Pratt is 31. NFL quarterback Tim Tebow is 27.

Thought for Today: “Freedom of speech and freedom of action are meaningless without freedom to think. And there is no freedom of thought without doubt.” — Bergen Baldwin Evans, American author (1904-1978).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, August 13, the 225th day of 2014. There are 140 days left in the year.

On August 13, 1934, the satirical comic strip “Li’l Abner,” created by Al Capp, made its debut.

In 1624, King Louis XIII of France appointed Cardinal Richelieu (ree-shuh-LYOO’) his first minister.

In 1792, French revolutionaries imprisoned the royal family.

In 1814, the Cape Colony in southern Africa was ceded by the Dutch to Britain. Swedish physicist Anders Jonas Angstrom was born in Logdo.

In 1846, the American flag was raised for the first time in Los Angeles.

In 1910, Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, died in London at age 90.

In 1923, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk was again elected Speaker of Turkey’s Grand Assembly.

In 1932, Adolf Hitler rejected the post of vice chancellor of Germany, saying he was prepared to hold out “for all or nothing.”

In 1946, author H.G. Wells, 79, died in London.

In 1961, East Germany sealed off the border between Berlin’s eastern and western sectors and began building a wall that would stand for the next 28 years.

In 1979, Lou Brock of the St. Louis Cardinals became the 14th player in major league baseball history to reach the 3,000th career hit plateau as his team defeated the Chicago Cubs, 3-2.

In 1981, in a ceremony at his California ranch, President Ronald Reagan signed a historic package of tax and budget reductions.

In 1989, searchers in Ethiopia found the wreckage of a plane which had disappeared almost a week earlier while carrying Rep. Mickey Leland, D-Texas, and 14 other people — there were no survivors.

Ten years ago: A stronger-than-expected Hurricane Charley roared ashore Florida’s Gulf Coast as a dangerous Category 4 storm, resulting in at least 10 U.S. deaths. Hutu marauders raided a U.N. refugee camp in western Burundi, shooting and hacking at least 150 Congolese Tutsis to death. The summer Olympic games officially opened in Athens. TV chef Julia Child died in Montecito, California, two days short of her 92nd birthday.

Five years ago: The Philadelphia Eagles signed Michael Vick to a one-year deal, prompting criticism from animal rights activists over his role in a dogfighting ring. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell suspended Cleveland Browns receiver Donte Stallworth for the entire season after Stallworth served 24 days in jail for DUI manslaughter in the death of 59-year-old Mario Reyes in Miami.

One year ago: Israel released 26 Palestinian inmates, many convicted in grisly killings, on the eve of long-stalled peace talks, angering families of those killed by the prisoners. Tompall Glaser, 79, a country music singer, publisher and studio owner best known for his association with the outlaw movement against record labels, died in Nashville.

Today’s Birthdays: Former Cuban President Fidel Castro is 88. Actor Pat Harrington is 85. Former U.S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders is 81. Actor Kevin Tighe is 70. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is 68. Actress Gretchen Corbett is 67. Opera singer Kathleen Battle is 66. High wire aerialist Philippe Petit is 65. Hockey Hall of Famer Bobby Clarke is 65. Golf Hall of Famer Betsy King is 59. Movie director Paul Greengrass is 59. Actor Danny Bonaduce is 55. TV weatherman Sam Champion is 53. Actress Dawnn (correct) Lewis is 53. Actor John Slattery is 52. Actress Debi Mazar is 50. Actress Quinn Cummings is 47. Actress Seana Kofoed is 44. Country singer Andy Griggs is 41. Country musician Mike Melancon (Emerson Drive) is 36. Actress Kathryn Fiore is 35. Pop-rock singer James Morrison is 30. Actress Lennon Stella (TV: “Nashville”) is 15.

Thought for Today: “The great business of life is to be, to do, to do without, and to depart.” — John, Viscount (VY’-kownt) Morley of Blackburn, English journalist (1838-1923).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, August 12, the 224th day of 2014. There are 141 days left in the year.

On August 12, 1939, the classic MGM movie musical “The Wizard of Oz,” starring Judy Garland, had its world premiere at the Strand Theater in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, three days before opening in Hollywood. (Oconomowoc was apparently chosen to test the film’s appeal to Middle Americans.)

In 1813, Austria declared war on France.

In 1867, President Andrew Johnson sparked a move to impeach him as he defied Congress by suspending Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton.

In 1898, fighting in the Spanish-American War came to an end.

In 1902, International Harvester Co. was formed by a merger of McCormick Harvesting Machine Co., Deering Harvester Co. and several other manufacturers.

In 1912, comedy producer Mack Sennett founded the Keystone Pictures Studio in Edendale, Calif.

In 1914, Britain and France declared war on Austria-Hungary.

In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated Hugo Black to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1944, during World War II, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., eldest son of Joseph and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot when their explosives-laden Navy plane blew up over England.

In 1953, the Soviet Union conducted a secret test of its first hydrogen bomb.

In 1960, the first balloon communications satellite — the Echo 1 — was launched by the United States from Cape Canaveral.

In 1962, one day after launching Andrian Nikolayev into orbit, the Soviet Union also sent up cosmonaut Pavel Popovich; both men landed safely August 15.

In 1964, author Ian Fleming, 56, the creator of James Bond, died in Canterbury, Kent, England.

In 1978, Pope Paul VI, who had died August 6 at age 80, was buried in St. Peter’s Basilica.

In 1985, the world’s worst single-aircraft disaster occurred as a crippled Japan Air Lines Boeing 747 on a domestic flight crashed into a mountain, killing 520 people. (Four people survived.)

In 1988, the controversial movie “The Last Temptation of Christ,” directed by Martin Scorsese (skohr-SEH’-see), opened in nine cities despite objections by some who felt the film was sacrilegious.

In 1994, in baseball’s eighth work stoppage since 1972, players went on strike rather than allow team owners to limit their salaries. (The strike ended in April 1995.) Woodstock ’94 opened in Saugerties, New York.

In 2003, Liberia’s leading rebel movement agreed to lift its siege of the capital and vital port, allowing food to flow to hundreds of thousands of hungry people.

Ten years ago: In a stunning declaration, New Jersey Gov. James E. McGreevey announced his resignation and acknowledged that he’d had an extramarital affair with another man. The California Supreme Court voided nearly 4,000 same-sex marriages sanctioned in San Francisco between February 12 and March 11, 2004.

Five years ago: Sen. Arlen Specter, D-Pa., heard a fresh chorus of taunts from opponents of health care reform at Penn State University; Specter said they were “not necessarily representative of America” but should be heard. Ehsanul Islam Sadequee, a 23-year-old Georgia man, was convicted of aiding terrorist groups by sending videotapes of U.S. landmarks overseas and plotting to support “violent jihad” after a federal jury in Atlanta rejected his arguments that it was empty talk. (Sadequee was sentenced to 17 years in prison.) Guitar virtuoso Les Paul died in White Plains, New York, at 94.

One year ago: James “Whitey” Bulger, the feared Boston mob boss who became one of the nation’s most-wanted fugitives, was convicted in a string of 11 killings and dozens of other gangland crimes, many of them committed while he was said to be an FBI informant. (Bulger is now serving a life sentence in federal prison.)

Today’s Birthdays: Former Sen. Dale Bumpers, D-Ark., is 89. Actor George Hamilton is 75. Actress Dana Ivey is 73. Actress Jennifer Warren is 73. Rock singer-musician Mark Knopfler (Dire Straits) is 65. Actor Jim Beaver is 64. Singer Kid Creole is 64. Jazz musician Pat Metheny is 60. Actor Sam J. Jones is 60. Actor Bruce Greenwood is 58. Country singer Danny Shirley is 58. Pop musician Roy Hay (Culture Club) is 53. Rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot is 51. Actor Peter Krause (KROW’-zuh) is 49. Actor Brent Sexton is 47. International Tennis Hall of Famer Pete Sampras is 43. Actor-comedian Michael Ian Black is 43. Actress Yvette Nicole Brown is 43. Actress Rebecca Gayheart is 43. Actor Casey Affleck is 39. Rock musician Bill Uechi (Save Ferris) is 39. Actress Maggie Lawson is 34. Actress Dominique Swain is 34. Actress Imani Hakim is 21.

Thought for Today: “If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.” — Rene Descartes, French philosopher (1596-1650).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Monday, August 11, the 223rd day of 2014. There are 142 days left in the year.

On August 11, 1954, a formal peace took hold in Indochina, ending more than seven years of fighting between the French and Communist Viet Minh.

In 1786, Capt. Francis Light arrived in Penang to claim the Malaysian island for Britain.

In 1860, the nation’s first successful silver mill began operation near Virginia City, Nevada.

In 1909, the steamship SS Arapahoe became the first ship in North America to issue an S.O.S. distress signal, off North Carolina’s Cape Hatteras.

In 1934, the first federal prisoners arrived at Alcatraz Island (a former military prison) in San Francisco Bay.

In 1942, during World War II, Pierre Laval, prime minister of Vichy France, publicly declared that “the hour of liberation for France is the hour when Germany wins the war.”

In 1956, abstract painter Jackson Pollock, 44, died in an automobile accident on Long Island, New York.

In 1964, the Beatles movie “A Hard Day’s Night” had its U.S. premiere in New York.

In 1965, rioting and looting that claimed 34 lives broke out in the predominantly black Watts section of Los Angeles.

In 1975, the United States vetoed the proposed admission of North and South Vietnam to the United Nations, following the Security Council’s refusal to consider South Korea’s application.

In 1984, during a voice test for a paid political radio address, President Ronald Reagan joked that he had “signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes.” At the Los Angeles Olympics, American runner Mary Decker fell after colliding with South African-born British competitor Zola Budd in the 3,000-meter final; Budd finished seventh.

In 1993, President Bill Clinton named Army Gen. John Shalikashvili (shah-lee-kash-VEE’-lee) to be the new chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, succeeding the retiring Gen. Colin Powell.

In 1997, President Bill Clinton made the first use of the historic line-item veto, rejecting three items in spending and tax bills. (However, the U.S. Supreme Court later struck down the veto as unconstitutional.)

Ten years ago: Britain granted its first license for human cloning for the purpose of stem cell research. The U.S. women’s soccer team defeated home team Greece 3-0 on the first day of competition in the 2004 Olympic Games (the opening ceremonies took place in Athens two days later).

Five years ago: A Myanmar court found democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi (ahng sahn soo chee) guilty of violating her house arrest by allowing an uninvited American to visit her home; she was ordered to serve an 18-month sentence under house arrest. Jeers and taunts drowned out Democratic lawmakers calling for a health care overhaul at town halls; during his own town hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, President Barack Obama assailed “wild misrepresentations” of his health care plan. Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy and founder of the Special Olympics, died in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, at age 88.

One year ago: Israel approved building 1,200 more settlement homes and agreed to release 26 long-held Palestinian security prisoners. Suspected militants gunned down 47 worshippers as they recited their early morning prayers at a mosque in Konduga, Nigeria, and killed another 12 civilians in a nearby village. Jason Dufner won his first major title with a two-stroke victory over Jim Furyk at the PGA Championship.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Arlene Dahl is 89. Songwriter-producer Kenny Gamble is 71. Rock musician Jim Kale (Guess Who) is 71. Magazine columnist Marilyn Vos Savant is 68. Country singer John Conlee is 68. Singer Eric Carmen is 65. Computer scientist and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is 64. Wrestler-actor Hulk Hogan is 61. Singer Joe Jackson is 60. Playwright David Henry Hwang is 57. Actor Miguel A. Nunez Jr. is 50. Actress Viola Davis is 49. Actor Duane Martin is 49. Actor-host Joe Rogan is 47. Rhythm-and-blues musician Chris Dave is 46. Actress Anna Gunn is 46. Actress Ashley Jensen is 46. Rock guitarist Charlie Sexton is 46. Hip-hop artist Ali Shaheed Muhammad is 44. Actor Nigel Harman (TV: “Downton Abbey”) is 41. Actor Will Friedle is 38. Actress Merritt Wever is 34. Actor Chris Hemsworth is 31. Rock musician Heath Fogg (Alabama Shakes) is 30. Singer J-Boog is 29. Rapper Asher Roth is 29. Actress Alyson Stoner is 21.

Thought for Today: “Keep your dreams, for in them lies joy denied to men grown wise.” — Edgar A. Guest, American author, journalist and poet (1881-1959).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Sunday, August 10, the 222nd day of 2014. There are 143 days left in the year.

On August 10, 1944, during World War II, American forces overcame remaining Japanese resistance on Guam.

In 1792, during the French Revolution, mobs in Paris attacked the Tuileries (TWEE’-luh-reez) Palace, where King Louis XVI resided. (The king was later arrested, put on trial for treason, and executed.)

In 1821, Missouri became the 24th state.

In 1846, President James K. Polk signed a measure establishing the Smithsonian Institution.

In 1874, Herbert Clark Hoover, the 31st president of the United States, was born in West Branch, Iowa.

In 1913, the Treaty of Bucharest was signed, ending the Second Balkan War.

In 1921, Franklin D. Roosevelt was stricken with polio at his summer home on the Canadian island of Campobello.

In 1949, the National Military Establishment was renamed the Department of Defense.

In 1962, the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum was dedicated in West Branch, Iowa, on the 88th birthday of the former president, who attended the ceremony along with former President Harry S. Truman.

In 1969, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca were murdered in their Los Angeles home by members of Charles Manson’s cult, one day after actress Sharon Tate and four other people had been slain.

In 1977, postal employee David Berkowitz was arrested in Yonkers, New York, accused of being “Son of Sam,” the gunman responsible for six slayings and seven woundings. (Berkowitz is serving six consecutive 25-years-to-life sentences.)

In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed a measure providing $20,000 payments to still-living Japanese-Americans who’d been interned by their government during World War II.

In 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as the second female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush chose Porter Goss, a Republican congressman and one-time spy, to lead the CIA. A boat carrying Dominican migrants seeking a better life in Puerto Rico drifted back to almost the same spot where the voyage began nearly two weeks earlier; at least 55 of the 86 people on board had died. The 20-year-old woman who’d accused Kobe Bryant of rape filed a federal lawsuit in Denver against the NBA star. (The criminal charge was later dropped; the lawsuit was settled out of court, terms undisclosed.) Barry Bonds became the first player in major league history to hit 30 home runs in 13 consecutive seasons, connecting in San Francisco’s 8-7 loss to Pittsburgh.

Five years ago: While attending a North American summit in Mexico, President Barack Obama predicted that Congress would pass his sweeping health care overhaul in the fall as more “sensible and reasoned arguments” prevailed. A double truck bombing tore through the village of a small Shiite ethnic minority near Mosul, Iraq, killing at least 28 people. Country duo Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn posted a message on their Web site announcing they had agreed to “call it a day” after 20 years of making music together.

One year ago: In an address at the Disabled American Veterans’ convention in Orlando, Florida, President Barack Obama assured disabled veterans that his administration was making progress on reducing a backlog of disability claims. A harrowing weeklong search for a missing California teenager ended when FBI agents rescued 16-year-old Hannah Anderson and shot and killed 40-year-old James Lee DiMaggio at a campsite deep in the Idaho wilderness. (Authorities say in addition to kidnapping Hannah, DiMaggio killed her brother and mother at his home east of San Diego.) Singer Edyie Gorme, 84, died in Las Vegas.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Rhonda Fleming is 91. Singer Ronnie Spector is 71. Actor James Reynolds is 68. Rock singer-musician Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull) is 67. Country musician Gene Johnson (Diamond Rio) is 65. Singer Patti Austin is 64. Actor Daniel Hugh Kelly is 62. Folk singer-songwriter Sam Baker is 60. Actress Rosanna Arquette is 55. Actor Antonio Banderas is 54. Rock musician Jon Farriss (INXS) is 53. Singer Julia Fordham is 52. Journalist-blogger Andrew Sullivan is 51. Actor Chris Caldovino (TV: “Boardwalk Empire”; “The Sopranos”) is 51. Singer Neneh Cherry is 50. Singer Aaron Hall is 50. Boxer Riddick Bowe is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Lorraine Pearson (Five Star) is 47. Singer-producer Michael Bivins is 46. Actor-writer Justin Theroux is 43. Actress Angie Harmon is 42. Country singer Jennifer Hanson is 41. Actress JoAnna Garcia is 35. Singer Cary Ann Hearst (Shovels & Rope) is 35. Rhythm-and-blues singer Nikki Bratcher (Divine) is 34. Actor Ryan Eggold is 30. Actor Lucas Till is 24.

Thought for Today: “A man may fulfill the object of his existence by asking a question he cannot answer, and attempting a task he cannot achieve.” — Oliver Wendell Holmes, American author (1809-1894).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Sunday, August 3, the 215th day of 2014. There are 150 days left in the year.

On August 3, 1914, Germany declared war on France at the onset of World War I.

In 1492, Christopher Columbus set sail from Palos, Spain, on a voyage that took him to the present-day Americas.

In 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr went on trial before a federal court in Richmond, Virginia, charged with treason. (He was acquitted less than a month later.)

In 1863, the first thoroughbred horse races took place at the Saratoga Race Course in Saratoga Springs, New York.

In 1936, Jesse Owens of the United States won the first of his four gold medals at the Berlin Olympics as he took the 100-meter sprint.

In 1943, Gen. George S. Patton slapped a private at an army hospital in Sicily, accusing him of cowardice. (Patton was later ordered by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower to apologize for this and a second, similar episode.)

In 1949, the National Basketball Association was formed as a merger of the Basketball Association of America and the National Basketball League.

In 1958, the nuclear-powered submarine USS Nautilus became the first vessel to cross the North Pole underwater.

In 1966, comedian Lenny Bruce, 40, was found dead in his Los Angeles home.

In 1972, the U.S. Senate ratified the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union. (The U.S. unilaterally withdrew from the treaty in 2002.)

In 1981, U.S. air traffic controllers went on strike, despite a warning from President Ronald Reagan they would be fired, which they were.

In 1993, the Senate voted 96-3 to confirm U.S. Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In 1994, Arkansas carried out the nation’s first triple execution in 32 years. Stephen G. Breyer was sworn in as the Supreme Court’s newest justice in a private ceremony at Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist’s Vermont summer home.

Ten years ago: Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge defended the decision to tighten security in New York and Washington even though the intelligence behind the latest terror warnings was as much as four years old. The Statue of Liberty pedestal in New York City reopened to the public for the first time since the 9/11 attacks. NASA launched space probe Messenger on a quest to reveal the secrets of mysterious, superhot Mercury, the sun’s nearest planet. French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson died at age 95.

Five years ago: Iran’s supreme leader formally endorsed Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (ah-muh-DEE’-neh-zhahd) for a second term as president. A court in Los Angeles appointed Michael Jackson’s mother, Katherine, permanent guardian of the late pop star’s children.

One year ago: President Barack Obama’s trade representative, Michael Froman, vetoed a yet-to-be-enacted ban on imports of Chinese-made Apple iPads and iPhones, overruling the U.S. International Trade Commission and dealing a setback to rival South Korean electronics company Samsung. Zimbabwe’s electoral panel declared that longtime President Robert Mugabe had won re-election by a landslide.

Today’s Birthdays: Author P.D. James is 94. Football Hall-of-Fame coach Marv Levy is 89. Singer Tony Bennett is 88. Actor Martin Sheen is 74. College and Pro Football Hall of Famer Lance Alworth is 74. Lifestyle guru Martha Stewart is 73. Singer Beverly Lee (The Shirelles) is 73. Rock musician B.B. Dickerson is 65. Movie director John Landis is 64. Actress JoMarie Payton is 64. Actor Jay North (“Dennis the Menace”) is 63. Hockey Hall-of-Famer Marcel Dionne is 63. Country musician Randy Scruggs is 61. Actor Philip Casnoff is 60. Actor John C. McGinley is 55. Rock singer-musician Lee Rocker (The Stray Cats) is 53. Actress Lisa Ann Walter is 53. Rock singer James Hetfield (Metallica) is 51. Rock singer-musician Ed Roland (Collective Soul) is 51. Actor Isaiah Washington is 51. Country musician Dean Sams (Lonestar) is 48. Rock musician Stephen Carpenter (Deftones) is 44. Hip-hop artist Spinderella (Salt-N-Pepa) is 43. Actress Brigid Brannagh is 42. Actor Michael Ealy is 41. Country musician Jimmy De Martini (Zac Brown Band) is 38. NFL quarterback Tom Brady is 37. Actress Evangeline (ee-VAN’-gel-een) Lilly is 35. Actress Mamie Gummer is 31. Country singer Whitney Duncan is 30. Actor Jon Foster is 30. Actress Georgina Haig (TV: “Once Upon a Time”; “Reckless”) is 29. Singer Holly Arnstein (Dream) is 29. Actress Tanya Fischer is 29. Pop-rock musician Brent Kutzle (OneRepublic) is 29.

Thought for Today: “It takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature.” — Henry James, American author (1843-1916).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Saturday, August 2, the 214th day of 2014. There are 151 days left in the year.

On August 2, 1964, the destroyer USS Maddox suffered light damage during a skirmish with North Vietnamese patrol torpedo boats in the Gulf of Tonkin. (This and an alleged second incident two days later led to congressional approval of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution that propelled America deep into war.)

In 1776, members of the Continental Congress began attaching their signatures to the Declaration of Independence.

In 1873, inventor Andrew S. Hallidie (HAH’-lih-day) successfully tested a cable car he had designed for the city of San Francisco.

In 1876, frontiersman “Wild Bill” Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker at a saloon in Deadwood, Dakota Territory, by Jack McCall, who was later hanged.

In 1909, the original Lincoln “wheat” penny first went into circulation, replacing the “Indian Head” cent.

In 1923, the 29th president of the United States, Warren G. Harding, died in San Francisco; Vice President Calvin Coolidge became president.

In 1934, German President Paul von Hindenburg died, paving the way for Adolf Hitler’s complete takeover.

In 1939, Albert Einstein signed a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt urging creation of an atomic weapons research program. President Roosevelt signed the Hatch Act, which prohibited civil service employees from taking an active part in political campaigns.

In 1943, during World War II, U.S. Navy boat PT-109, commanded by Lt. (jg) John F. Kennedy, sank after being rammed in the middle of the night by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri off the Solomon Islands. Two crew members were killed.

In 1945, President Harry S. Truman, Soviet leader Josef Stalin and British Prime Minister Clement Attlee concluded the Potsdam conference.

In 1974, former White House counsel John W. Dean III was sentenced to one to four years in prison for obstruction of justice in the Watergate coverup. (Dean ended up serving four months.)

In 1985, 135 people were killed when a Delta Air Lines jetliner crashed while attempting to land at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

In 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, seizing control of the oil-rich emirate. (The Iraqis were later driven out in Operation Desert Storm.)

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush urged creation of a national intelligence director to coordinate the war on terrorism but without the sweeping powers for hiring, firing and spending recommended by the September 11 commission. Turkish truckers stopped hauling goods for U.S. forces in Iraq after the shooting of a Turkish hostage was shown on the Internet. Police in Salt Lake City arrested Mark Hacking, whose wife, Lori, had disappeared. (Hacking later pleaded guilty to first-degree murder.)

Five years ago: A mystery from the 1991 Gulf War was finally solved as the Pentagon announced that the remains of missing Navy pilot Michael “Scott” Speicher (SPY’-kur) had been found. Catriona Matthew won the Women’s British Open for her first major title, beating Karrie Webb by three strokes.

One year ago: The United States issued an extraordinary global travel warning to Americans about the threat of an al-Qaida attack and closed down 21 embassies and consulates across the Muslim world for the weekend.

Today’s Birthdays: Former Sen. Paul Laxalt, R-Nev., is 92. Rock musician Garth Hudson (The Band) is 77. Movie director Wes Craven is 75. Singer Kathy Lennon (The Lennon Sisters) is 71. Actor Max Wright is 71. Actress Joanna Cassidy is 69. Actress Kathryn Harrold is 64. Actor Butch Patrick (TV: “The Munsters”) is 61. Rock music producer/drummer Butch Vig (Garbage) is 59. Singer Mojo Nixon is 57. Actress Victoria Jackson is 55. Actress Apollonia is 55. Actress Cynthia Stevenson is 52. Actress Mary-Louise Parker is 50. Rock musician John Stanier is 46. Writer-actor-director Kevin Smith is 44. Actor Sam Worthington is 38. Figure skater Michael Weiss is 38. Actor Edward Furlong is 37. Rock musician Devon Glenn is 34. Actress Hallie Eisenberg is 22.

Thought for Today: “A beautiful soul has no other merit than its own existence.” — Friedrich von Schiller, German author (1759-1805).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Monday, July 28, the 209th day of 2014. There are 156 days left in the year.

On July 28, 1914, World War I began as Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia.

In 1540, King Henry VIII’s chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, was executed, the same day Henry married his fifth wife, Catherine Howard.

In 1655, French dramatist and novelist Cyrano de Bergerac, the inspiration for a play by Edmond Rostand, died in Paris at age 36.

In 1794, Maximilien Robespierre, a leading figure of the French Revolution, was sent to the guillotine.

In 1821, Peru declared its independence from Spain.

In 1928, the Summer Olympic games opened in Amsterdam.

In 1932, federal troops forcibly dispersed the so-called “Bonus Army” of World War I veterans who had gathered in Washington to demand payments they weren’t scheduled to receive until 1945.

In 1945, a U.S. Army bomber crashed into the 79th floor of New York’s Empire State Building, killing 14 people. The U.S. Senate ratified the United Nations Charter by a vote of 89-2.

In 1959, in preparation for statehood, Hawaiians voted to send the first Chinese-American, Republican Hiram L. Fong, to the U.S. Senate and the first Japanese-American, Democrat Daniel K. Inouye, to the U.S. House of Representatives.

In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced he was increasing the number of American troops in South Vietnam from 75,000 to 125,000 “almost immediately.”

In 1976, an earthquake devastated northern China, killing at least 242,000 people, according to an official estimate.

In 1984, the Los Angeles Summer Olympics opened.

In 1989, Israeli commandos abducted a pro-Iranian Shiite (SHEE’-eyet) Muslim cleric, Sheik Abdul-Karim Obeid (AHB’-dool kah-REEM’ oh-BAYD’), from his home in south Lebanon. (He was released in January 2004 as part of a prisoner swap.)

Ten years ago: The Democratic National Convention in Boston nominated John Kerry for president. A car bomb exploded outside a police station used as a recruiting center in Baqouba, Iraq, killing 70 Iraqis. Francis Crick, a Nobel Prize-winning scientist who co-discovered the double-helix structure of DNA, died in San Diego at age 88.

Five years ago: The Senate Judiciary Committee approved Judge Sonia Sotomayor to be the U.S. Supreme Court’s first Hispanic justice, over nearly solid Republican opposition. Anti-abortion activist Scott Roeder (ROH’-dur) pleaded not guilty in Wichita, Kansas, to killing late-term abortion provider George Tiller. (Roeder was later convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.) The Rev. Frederick J. Eikerenkoetter II, better known as “Reverend Ike,” who preached the gospel of material prosperity to millions nationwide, died in Los Angeles at age 74.

One year ago: Pope Francis’ historic trip to his home continent of South America ended after a marathon week in Brazil. In southern Italy, 39 people were killed when a tour bus plunged into a ravine. An armed thief stole a $136 million diamond collection from a jewelry show at the Carlton International Hotel in Cannes, France. William Warren Scranton, 96, a former presidential candidate, ambassador to the U.N. and Pennsylvania governor, died in Montecito, California. Actress-singer Eileen Brennan, 80, died in Burbank, California.

Today’s Birthdays: Movie director Andrew V. McLaglen is 94. Actor Darryl Hickman is 83. Ballet dancer-choreographer Jacques d’Amboise is 80. Musical conductor Riccardo Muti is 73. Former Senator and NBA Hall of Famer Bill Bradley is 71. “Garfield” creator Jim Davis is 69. Singer Jonathan Edwards is 68. Actress Linda Kelsey is 68. TV producer Dick Ebersol is 67. Actress Sally Struthers is 66. Actress Georgia Engel is 66. Rock musician Simon Kirke (Bad Company) is 65. Rock musician Steve Morse (Deep Purple) is 60. CBS anchorman Scott Pelley is 57. Alt-country-rock musician Marc Perlman is 53. Actor Michael Hayden is 51. Actress Lori Loughlin is 50. Jazz musician-producer Delfeayo Marsalis is 49. Former hockey player turned general manager Garth Snow is 45. Actress Elizabeth Berkley is 42. Singer Afroman is 40. Country musician Todd Anderson (Heartland) is 39. Rock singer Jacoby Shaddix (Papa Roach) is 38. Country singer Carly Goodwin is 33. Actor Dustin Milligan is 29. Actor Nolan Gerard Funk is 28. Rapper Soulja Boy is 24. Pop/rock singer Cher Lloyd (TV: finalist “The X Factor”) is 21.

Thought for Today: “It is impossible to write ancient history because we lack source materials, and impossible to write modern history because we have far too many.” — Charles Peguy (pay-GEE’), French poet and writer (1873-1914).

Today in History

Today is Friday, July 25, the 206th day of 2014. There are 159 days left in the year.

On July 25, 1994, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Jordan’s King Hussein (hoo-SAYN’) signed a declaration at the White House ending their countries’ 46-year-old formal state of war.

In 1554, Queen Mary I of England married Philip II, future King of Spain.

In 1814, the Battle of Lundy’s Lane, one of the bloodiest battles of the War of 1812, took place in present-day Niagara Falls, Ontario, with no clear victor.

In 1909, French aviator Louis Bleriot (bleh-ree-OH’) became the first person to fly an airplane across the English Channel, traveling from Calais (kah-LAY’) to Dover in 37 minutes.

In 1934, Austrian Chancellor Engelbert Dollfuss was assassinated by pro-Nazi Austrians in a failed coup attempt.

In 1943, Benito Mussolini was dismissed as premier of Italy by King Victor Emmanuel III, and placed under arrest. (However, Mussolini was later rescued by the Nazis, and re-asserted his authority.)

In 1944, Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters recorded Cole Porter’s “Don’t Fence Me In” in Los Angeles for Decca Records.

In 1952, Puerto Rico became a self-governing commonwealth of the United States.

In 1956, the Italian liner Andrea Doria collided with the Swedish passenger ship Stockholm off the New England coast late at night and began sinking; at least 51 people were killed.

In 1960, a Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, North Carolina, that had been the scene of a sit-in protest against its whites-only lunch counter dropped its segregation policy.

In 1978, Louise Joy Brown, the first “test tube baby,” was born in Oldham, England; she’d been conceived through the technique of in-vitro fertilization.

In 1984, Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya (sah-VEETS’-kah-yah) became the first woman to walk in space as she carried out more than three hours of experiments outside the orbiting space station Salyut 7.

In 2000, a New York-bound Air France Concorde crashed outside Paris shortly after takeoff, killing all 109 people on board and four people on the ground; it was the first-ever crash of the supersonic jet.

Ten years ago: Israelis formed a human chain stretching 55 miles from Gaza to Jerusalem to protest Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s Gaza Strip withdrawal plan. Lance Armstrong won a record sixth Tour de France.

Five years ago: President Barack Obama continued his full-court press to pass health care reform legislation, citing a new White House study indicating that small businesses were paying far more per employee for health insurance than big companies, a disparity the president said was “unsustainable” as well as “unacceptable.” Protesters across the world called on Iran to end its clampdown on opposition activists.

One year ago: Pope Francis, dubbed the “slum pope” for his work with the poor, received a rapturous welcome from one of Rio de Janeiro’s most violent shantytowns and demanded the world’s wealthy end the injustices that had left the poor on the margins of society.

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Barbara Harris is 79. Folk-pop singer-musician Bruce Woodley (The Seekers) is 72. Rock musician Jim McCarty (The Yardbirds) is 71. Rock musician Verdine White (Earth, Wind & Fire) is 63. Singer-musician Jem Finer (The Pogues) is 59. Model-actress Iman is 59. Cartoonist Ray Billingsley (“Curtis”) is 57. Rock musician Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth) is 56. Actress-singer Bobbie Eakes is 53. Actress Katherine Kelly Lang is 53. Actress Illeana Douglas is 49. Country singer Marty Brown is 49. Actor Matt LeBlanc is 47. Actress Wendy Raquel Robinson is 47. Rock musician Paavo Lotjonen (PAH’-woh LAHT’-joh-nehn) (Apocalyptica) is 46. Actor D.B. Woodside is 45. Actress Miriam Shor is 43. Actor David Denman is 41. Actor Jay R. Ferguson is 40. Actor James Lafferty is 29. Actress Shantel VanSanten is 29. Actor Michael Welch is 27. Classical singer Faryl Smith is 19.

Thought for Today: “Life is not a matter of milestones, but of moments.” — Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy (1890-1995).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa News Room [G.N.R] Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Thursday, July 24, the 205th day of 2014. There are 160 days left in the year.

On July 24, 1974, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that President Richard Nixon had to turn over subpoenaed White House tape recordings to the Watergate special prosecutor.

In 1783, Latin American revolutionary Simon Bolivar (see-MOHN’ boh-LEE’-vahr) was born in Caracas, Venezuela.

In 1862, Martin Van Buren, the eighth president of the United States, and the first to have been born a U.S. citizen, died at age 79 in Kinderhook, New York, the town where he was born in 1782.

In 1866, Tennessee became the first state to be readmitted to the Union after the Civil War.

In 1911, Yale University history professor Hiram Bingham III found the “Lost City of the Incas,” Machu Picchu, in Peru.

In 1923, the Treaty of Lausanne, which settled the boundaries of modern Turkey, was concluded in Switzerland.

In 1937, the state of Alabama dropped charges against four of the nine young black men accused of raping two white women in the “Scottsboro Case.”

In 1952, President Harry S. Truman announced a settlement in a 53-day steel strike.

In 1959, during a visit to Moscow, Vice President Richard Nixon engaged in his famous “Kitchen Debate” with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev.

In 1969, the Apollo 11 astronauts — two of whom had been the first men to set foot on the moon — splashed down safely in the Pacific.

In 1987, Hulda Crooks, a 91-year-old mountaineer from California, became the oldest woman to conquer Mount Fuji, Japan’s highest peak.

In 1998, a gunman burst into the U.S. Capitol, killing two police officers before being shot and captured. (The shooter, Russell Eugene Weston Jr., is being held in a federal mental facility.)

In 2002, nine coal miners became trapped in a flooded tunnel of the Quecreek Mine in western Pennsylvania; the story ended happily 77 hours later with the rescue of all nine.

Ten years ago: Without promising what specific steps he would take, President George W. Bush said in his weekly radio address that his administration was committed to relying on the recommendations of the September 11 commission in waging the war on terrorism. Former Nixon administration official Fred LaRue, who served a prison term for Watergate, died in Biloxi, Mississippi, at age 75.

Five years ago: Trying to tamp down a national uproar over race, President Barack Obama acknowledged using unfortunate words in declaring that Cambridge, Massachusetts, police had “acted stupidly” in arresting black scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr., adding he’d invited the Harvard professor and Sgt. James Crowley, the arresting officer, for “a beer here in the White House.”

One year ago: The House narrowly rejected, 217-205, a challenge to the National Security Agency’s secret collection of hundreds of millions of Americans’ phone records. A high-speed train crash outside Santiago de Compostela in northwest Spain killed 79 people. Pope Francis made an emotional plea in Aparecida, Brazil, for Roman Catholics to shun materialism in the first public Mass of his initial international trip as pontiff. It was announced by Kensington Palace that the newborn son of Prince William and Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, would be named George Alexander Louis. Virginia Johnson, half of the renowned Masters and Johnson team of sex researchers, died in St. Louis at age 88.

Today’s Birthdays: Actor John Aniston is 81. Political cartoonist Pat Oliphant is 79. Comedian Ruth Buzzi is 78. Actor Mark Goddard is 78. Actor Dan Hedaya is 74. Actor Chris Sarandon is 72. Comedian Gallagher is 68. Actor Robert Hays is 67. Former Republican national chairman Marc Racicot (RAWS’-koh) is 66. Actor Michael Richards is 65. Actress Lynda Carter is 63. Movie director Gus Van Sant is 62. Country singer Pam Tillis is 57. Actor Paul Ben-Victor is 52. Actor Kadeem Hardison is 49. Actress-singer Kristin Chenoweth is 46. Actress Laura Leighton is 46. Actor John P. Navin Jr. is 46. Actress-singer Jennifer Lopez is 45. Basketball player-turned-actor Rick Fox is 45. Actor Eric Szmanda is 39. Actress Rose Byrne is 35. Country singer Jerrod Niemann is 35. Actress Summer Glau is 33. Actress Elisabeth Moss is 32. Actress Anna Paquin is 32. Actress Megan Park is 28. Actress Mara Wilson is 27. Rock singer Jay McGuiness (The Wanted) is 24. Actress Emily Bett Rickards (TV: Arrow”) is 23. TV personality Bindi Irwin is 16.

Thought for Today: “Everything has two sides — the outside that is ridiculous, and the inside that is solemn.” — Olive Schreiner, South African author and feminist (1855-1920).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today in History

Today is Wednesday, July 16, the 197th day of 2014. There are 168 days left in the year.

On July 16, 1945, the United States exploded its first experimental atomic bomb in the desert of Alamogordo, New Mexico

In 1790, a site along the Potomac River was designated the permanent seat of the United States government; the area became Washington, D.C.

In 1862, Flag Officer David G. Farragut became the first rear admiral in the United States Navy.

In 1912, New York gambler Herman Rosenthal, set to testify before a grand jury about police corruption, was gunned down by members of the Lennox Avenue Gang.

In 1935, the first parking meters were installed in Oklahoma City.

In 1951, the novel “The Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger was first published by Little, Brown and Co.

In 1964, as he accepted the Republican presidential nomination in San Francisco, Barry M. Goldwater declared that “extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice” and that “moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.”

In 1979, Saddam Hussein became president of Iraq.

In 1980, former California Gov. Ronald Reagan won the Republican presidential nomination at the party’s convention in Detroit.

In 1981, singer Harry Chapin was killed when his car was struck by a tractor-trailer on New York’s Long Island Expressway.

In 1989, conductor Herbert von Karajan died near Salzburg, Austria, at age 81.

In 1994, the first of 21 pieces of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 smashed into Jupiter, to the joy of astronomers awaiting the celestial fireworks.

In 1999, John F. Kennedy Jr., his wife, Carolyn, and her sister, Lauren Bessette, died when their single-engine plane, piloted by Kennedy, plunged into the Atlantic Ocean near Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.

Ten years ago: Martha Stewart was sentenced to five months in prison and five months of home confinement by a federal judge in New York for lying about a stock sale. Some 90 children were killed in a school fire in southern India. Chicago held the grand opening of its new Millennium Park. Former Georgia Gov. George Busbee died in Savannah at age 76.

Five years ago: Saying that civil rights leaders from decades past had paved the way for his election as the nation’s first black commander in chief, President Barack Obama paid homage to the NAACP during a convention in New York, and advised members that their work remained unfinished. In an embarrassing acknowledgment, NASA admitted that in all likelihood, it had recorded over the original videotapes of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

One year ago: Egypt’s interim leader, Adly Mansour, swore in a Cabinet that included women and Christians but no Islamists as the military-backed administration moved swiftly to formalize the new political order. Twenty-three children, between the ages of 5 and 12, were fatally poisoned by pesticide-contaminated lunches served at a school in eastern India. The American League beat the National League 3-0 in the All-Star Game.

Today’s Birthdays: Former Attorney General Dick Thornburgh is 82. Soul singer Denise LaSalle is 80. Soul singer William Bell is 75. International Tennis Hall of Famer Margaret Court is 72. College Football Hall of Famer and football coach Jimmy Johnson is 71. Violinist Pinchas Zukerman is 66. Actor-singer Ruben Blades is 66. Rock composer-musician Stewart Copeland is 62. Playwright Tony Kushner is 58. Dancer Michael Flatley is 56. Actress Phoebe Cates is 51. Actor Daryl “Chill” Mitchell is 49. Actor-comedian Will Ferrell is 47. Actor Jonathan Adams is 47. College and Pro Football Hall of Famer Barry Sanders is 46. Actress Rain Pryor is 45. Actor Corey Feldman is 43. Rock musician Ed Kowalczyk (Live) is 43. Rock singer Ryan McCombs (Drowning Pool) is 40. Actress Jayma Mays is 35. Actress AnnaLynne McCord is 27. Actor-singer James Maslow is 24. Actor Mark Indelicato is 20.

Thought for Today: “I think I’ve discovered the secret of life — you just hang around until you get used to it.” — Charles M. Schulz, American cartoonist (1922-2000).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Tuesday, July 15, the 196th day of 2014. There are 169 days left in the year.

On July 15, 1964, Sen. Barry M. Goldwater of Arizona was nominated for president by the Republican national convention in San Francisco.

In 1799, French soldiers in Egypt discovered the Rosetta Stone, which proved instrumental in deciphering ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs.
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In 1870, Georgia became the last Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union. Manitoba entered confederation as the fifth Canadian province.

In 1916, Boeing Co., originally known as Pacific Aero Products Co., was founded in Seattle.

In 1932, President Herbert Hoover announced he was slashing his own salary by 20 percent, from $75,000 to $60,000 a year; he also cut Cabinet members’ salaries by 15 percent, from $15,000 to $12,750 a year.

In 1948, President Harry S. Truman was nominated for another term of office by the Democratic national convention in Philadelphia.

In 1954, a prototype of the Boeing 707, the model 367-80, made its maiden flight from Renton Field south of Seattle.

In 1971, President Richard Nixon delivered a televised address in which he announced that he had accepted an invitation to visit the People’s Republic of China.

In 1976, a 36-hour kidnap ordeal began for 26 schoolchildren and their bus driver as they were abducted near Chowchilla, California, by three gunmen and imprisoned in an underground cell. (The captives escaped unharmed.)

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter delivered his “malaise” speech in which he lamented what he called a “crisis of confidence” in America.

In 1983, eight people were killed when a suitcase bomb planted by Armenian extremists exploded at the Turkish Airlines counter at Orly Airport in Paris.

In 1992, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton was nominated for president at the Democratic national convention in New York.

In 2010, after 85 days, BP stopped the flow of oil from a blown-out well in the Gulf of Mexico using a 75-ton cap lowered onto the wellhead earlier in the week.

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush signed into law a measure imposing mandatory prison terms for criminals who used identity theft in committing terrorist acts and other offenses. The Senate approved a plan to pay tobacco farmers $12 billion to give up federal quotas propping up their prices. Retired Air Force Gen. Charles W. Sweeney, who’d piloted the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Nagasaki in the final days of World War II, died in Boston at age 84.

Five years ago: A Russian-made Iranian jetliner carrying 168 people crashed after taking off from Tehran, killing everyone aboard. After more than a month’s delay, space shuttle Endeavour and seven astronauts thundered into orbit on a flight to the international space station.

One year ago: Two days after a Florida jury acquitted George Zimmerman in the death of Trayvon Martin, Attorney General Eric Holder called the killing a “tragic, unnecessary shooting,” and said the Justice Department would follow “the facts and the law” as it reviewed evidence to see whether federal criminal charges were warranted. (Federal authorities have yet to reach a decision in the case.) Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, the notoriously brutal leader of the feared Zetas drug cartel, was captured in the first major blow against an organized crime leader by Mexican officials.

Today’s Birthdays: Author Clive Cussler is 83. Actor Ken Kercheval is 79. Former Sen. George V. Voinovich, R-Ohio, is 78. Actor Patrick Wayne is 75. Actor Jan-Michael Vincent is 70. Rhythm-and-blues singer Millie Jackson is 70. Rock singer-musician Peter Lewis (Moby Grape) is 69. Singer Linda Ronstadt is 68. Rock musician Artimus Pyle is 66. Actor Terry O’Quinn is 62. Rock musician Marky Ramone is 58. Rock musician Joe Satriani is 58. Country singer-songwriter Mac McAnally is 57. Model Kim Alexis is 54. Actor Willie Aames is 54. Actor-director Forest Whitaker is 53. Actress Lolita Davidovich is 53. Actress Brigitte Nielsen is 51. Rock musician Jason Bonham is 48. Actress Amanda Foreman is 48. Actor Kristoff St. John is 48. Rock musician Phillip Fisher is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Stokley (Mint Condition) is 47. Actor-comedian Eddie Griffin is 46. Actor Stan Kirsch is 46. Actor Reggie Hayes is 45. Actor-screenwriter Jim Rash is 43. Rock musician John Dolmayan is 42. Actor Scott Foley is 42. Actor Brian Austin Green is 41. Rapper Jim Jones is 38. Actress Diane Kruger is 38. Actress Lana Parrilla (LAH’-nuh pa-REE’-uh) is 37. Rock musician Ray Toro (My Chemical Romance) is 37. Actress Laura Benanti is 35. Actor Travis Fimmel is 35. Rhythm-and-blues singer Kia Thornton (Divine) is 33. Actor Tristan Wilds is 25.

Thought for Today: “Advice is a free gift that can become expensive for the one who gets it.” — Armenian proverb.

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Wednesday, June 18, the 169th day of 2014. There are 196 days left in the year.

On June 18, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Japanese Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda spoke to each other by telephone as they inaugurated the first trans-Pacific cable completed by AT&T between Japan and Hawaii, and linked to existing cables between Hawaii and California. (Due to the time difference, it was already June 19 in Tokyo.)

In 1778, American forces entered Philadelphia as the British withdrew during the Revolutionary War.

In 1812, the War of 1812 began as the United States Congress approved, and President James Madison signed, a declaration of war against Britain.

In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte met his Waterloo as British and Prussian troops defeated the French in Belgium.

In 1873, suffragist Susan B. Anthony was found guilty by a judge in Canandaigua, New York, of breaking the law by casting a vote in the 1872 presidential election. (The judge fined Anthony $100, but she never paid the penalty.)

In 1908, William Howard Taft was nominated for president by the Republican National Convention in Chicago.

In 1912, the Republican National Convention, which would nominate President William Howard Taft for another term of office, opened in Chicago.

In 1940, during World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill urged his countrymen to conduct themselves in a manner that would prompt future generations to say, “This was their finest hour.”

In 1953, a U.S. Air Force Douglas C-124 Globemaster II crashed near Tokyo, killing all 129 people on board. Egypt’s 148-year-old Muhammad Ali Dynasty came to an end with the overthrow of the monarchy and the proclamation of a republic.

In 1972, 118 people were killed in the crash of a Brussels-bound British European Airways Hawker Siddeley Trident 1C shortly after takeoff from London Heathrow Airport.

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter and Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev signed the SALT II strategic arms limitation treaty in Vienna.

In 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride, 32, became America’s first woman in space as she and four colleagues blasted off aboard the space shuttle Challenger on a six-day mission.

In 1984, Alan Berg, a Denver radio talk show host, was shot to death outside his home. (Two white supremacists were later convicted of civil rights violations in the slaying.)

Ten years ago: An al-Qaida cell in Saudi Arabia beheaded American engineer Paul M. Johnson Jr., 49, posting grisly photographs of his severed head; hours later, Saudi security forces tracked down and killed the alleged mastermind of the kidnapping and murder. European Union leaders agreed on the first constitution for the bloc’s 25 members.

Five years ago: Tens of thousands of protesters filled the streets of Tehran again, joining opposition leader Mir Hossein Mousavi (meer hoh-SAYN’ moo-SAH’-vee) to mourn demonstrators killed in clashes over Iran’s disputed presidential election. Hortensia Bussi, the widow of Chilean President Salvador Allende who helped lead opposition to the military dictatorship that ousted her husband, died at 94. Washington Capitals forward Alex Ovechkin was named the NHL’s most valuable player for the second straight year after leading the league with 56 goals.

One year ago: The Taliban and the U.S. said they would hold talks on finding a political solution to ending nearly 12 years of war in Afghanistan, as the international coalition formally handed over control of the country’s security to the Afghan army and police. Declaring “the days of Rambo are over,” Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that cultural, social and behavioral concerns might be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military’s special operations units.

Today’s Birthdays: Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., is 77. Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Brock is 75. Rock singer-composer-musician Sir Paul McCartney is 72. Actress Constance McCashin is 67. Actress Linda Thorson is 67. Rock musician John Evans (The Box Tops) is 66. Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb., is 64. Actress Isabella Rossellini is 62. Actress Carol Kane is 62. Actor Brian Benben is 58. Actress Andrea Evans is 57. Rock singer Alison Moyet is 53. Rock musician Dizzy Reed (Guns N’ Roses) is 51. Figure skater Kurt Browning is 48. Country singer-musician Tim Hunt is 47. Rock singer-musician Sice (The Boo Radleys) is 45. Rhythm-and-blues singer Nathan Morris (Boyz II Men) is 43. Actress Mara Hobel is 43. Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne is 41. Rapper Silkk the Shocker is 39. Actress Alana de la Garza is 38. Country singer Blake Shelton is 38. Rock musician Steven Chen (Airborne Toxic Event) is 36. Actor David Giuntoli is 34. Actress Renee Olstead is 25. Actress Willa Holland is 23.

Thought for Today: Today: “The way of a superior man is three-fold; virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, he is free from perplexities; bold, he is free from fear.” — Confucius, Chinese philosopher (551-479 B.C.).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.

Today In History

Today is Thursday, June 12, the 163rd day of 2014. There are 202 days left in the year.

On June 12, 1939, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was dedicated in Cooperstown, New York.

In 1776, Virginia’s colonial legislature became the first to adopt a Bill of Rights.

In 1898, Philippine nationalists declared independence from Spain.

In 1920, the Republican national convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Warren G. Harding for president on the tenth ballot; Calvin Coolidge was nominated for vice president.

In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge was nominated for a term of office in his own right at the Republican national convention in Cleveland. (Coolidge had become president in 1923 upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding.)

In 1942, Anne Frank, a German-born Jewish girl living in Amsterdam, received a diary for her 13th birthday, less than a month before she and her family went into hiding from the Nazis.

In 1956, the Flag of the United States Army was officially adopted under an executive order signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers, 37, was shot and killed outside his home in Jackson, Mississippi. (In 1994, Byron De La Beckwith was convicted of murdering Evers and sentenced to life in prison; he died in 2001.) One of Hollywood’s most notoriously expensive productions, “Cleopatra,” starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Rex Harrison, opened in New York.

In 1964, South African black nationalist Nelson Mandela was sentenced to life in prison along with seven other people, including Walter Sisulu, for committing sabotage against the apartheid regime (all were eventually released, Mandela in 1990).

In 1967, the Supreme Court, in Loving v. Virginia, struck down state laws prohibiting interracial marriages.

In 1974, President Richard Nixon arrived in Cairo, Egypt, at the beginning of a Middle East tour.

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan, during a visit to the divided German city of Berlin, publicly challenged Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to “tear down this wall.”

In 1994, Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman were slashed to death outside her Los Angeles home. (O.J. Simpson was later acquitted of the killings in a criminal trial, but was eventually held liable in a civil action.) Boeing’s new 777 jetliner went on its first test flight.

Ten years ago: Gunmen firing from a car killed Iraq’s deputy foreign minister (Bassam Salih Kubba). Suspected militants killed an American in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Former President Ronald Reagan’s body was sealed inside a tomb at his presidential library in Simi Valley, California, following a week of mourning and remembrance by world leaders and regular Americans.

Five years ago: U.S. television stations ended analog broadcasts in favor of digital transmission. Congress approved legislation banning “light” or candy-flavored cigarettes and requiring tobacco companies to make bigger warning labels and run fewer ads. The U.N. Security Council imposed sanctions on North Korea for its second nuclear test. The Pittsburgh Penguins defeated the Detroit Red Wings 2-1 to win the Stanley Cup in Game 7.

One year ago: The director of the National Security Agency, Gen. Keith Alexander, vigorously defended once-secret surveillance programs before the Senate Intelligence Committee, saying that collecting Americans’ phone records and tapping into their Internet activity had disrupted dozens of terrorist attacks. Ariel Castro, accused of holding three women captive in his Cleveland home for about a decade, pleaded not guilty to hundreds of rape and kidnapping charges. (Castro was later sentenced to life plus 1,000 years and soon after committed suicide in prison.) NASCAR driver Jason Leffler, 37, died after an accident at a dirt car event at Bridgeport Speedway in New Jersey.

Today’s Birthdays: Banker/philanthropist David Rockefeller is 99. Former President George H.W. Bush is 90. Singer Vic Damone is 86. Songwriter Richard Sherman is 86. Actor-singer Jim Nabors is 84. Jazz musician Chick Corea is 73. Sportscaster Marv Albert is 73. Singer Roy Harper is 73. Pop singer Len Barry is 72. Rock singer-musician John Wetton (Asia, King Crimson) is 65. Rock musician Bun E. Carlos (Cheap Trick) is 63. Country singer-musician Junior Brown is 62. Singer-songwriter Rocky Burnette is 61. Actor Timothy Busfield is 57. Singer Meredith Brooks is 56. Actress Jenilee Harrison is 56. Rock musician John Linnell (They Might Be Giants) is 55. Rapper Grandmaster Dee (Whodini) is 52. Actor Paul Schulze (TV: “Nurse Jackie”) is 52. Actress Paula Marshall is 50. Actress Frances O’Connor is 47. Actor Rick Hoffman is 44. Actor Jason Mewes is 40. Actor Michael Muhney is 39. Blues musician Kenny Wayne Shepherd is 37. Actor Wil Horneff is 35. Singer Robyn is 35. Actor Dave Franco is 29. Country singer Chris Young is 29. Rap group MC Jay Are is 25. Actor Ryan Malgarini is 22.

Thought for Today: “A man without ambition is dead. A man with ambition but no love is dead. A man with ambition and love for his blessings here on earth is ever so alive.” — Pearl Bailey, American entertainer (1918-1990).

DISCLAIMER: Gaza-Tshisa Encourages Freedom Of Speech And The Expression Of Diverse Views.